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CS/CS/HB 249 — Culinary Education Programs

by Health and Human Services Committee; Health Quality Subcommittee; and Rep. Moskowitz and others (CS/SB 706 by Regulated Industries Committee; and Senators Altman and Sachs)

This summary is provided for information only and does not represent the opinion of any Senator, Senate Officer, or Senate Office.

Prepared by: Regulated Industries Committee (RI)

The bill permits a culinary education program with a public food service establishment license issued by the Division of Hotels and Restaurants within the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) to obtain a special alcoholic beverage license that permits the sale of beer, wine, and liquor. The special license allows for the sale of alcoholic beverages on the licensed premise in designated areas only. If the culinary education program is a licensed caterer, the bill allows for the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages on the premises of the catered event at which the licensee is also providing prepared food. The bill does not permit the sale of alcoholic beverages by the package for off-premises consumption.

The bill defines a culinary education program to mean a program that educates enrolled students in the culinary arts, including preparation, cooking, and presentation of food, or a program that provides education and experience in culinary arts-related businesses. A culinary education program must be inspected by a state agency for compliance with sanitation standards. The culinary education program must be provided by a:

  • State university;
  • Florida College System institution;
  • Career center;
  • Charter technical career center;
  • Nonprofit independent college or university that is located and chartered in this state, meets certain accreditation requirements, and is eligible to participate in the William L. Boyd, IV, Florida Resident Access Grant Program; or
  • Nonpublic postsecondary educational institution.

The requirement that the caterer derive 51 percent of its gross revenue from the sale of food and nonalcoholic beverages to be eligible for a special alcoholic beverage license does not apply to a culinary education program with a public food service establishment license.

Under current law, if a culinary education program is subject to the food safety and sanitation regulations of the Department of Health, it will remain subject to its regulation, regardless of whether there is a charge for the food or whether the program is inspected by another state agency for compliance with sanitation standards.

The bill authorizes the DBPR to adopt rules to administer the bill’s provisions.

If approved by the Governor, these provisions take effect July 1, 2016.

Vote: Senate 37-0; House 114-0