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2012 Florida Statutes

Chapter 397
SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES
CHAPTER 397
CHAPTER 397
SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES
GENERAL PROVISIONS
(ss. 397.301-397.334)
SERVICE PROVIDERS
(ss. 397.401-397.486)
CLIENT RIGHTS
(ss. 397.501, 397.581)
VOLUNTARY ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
(s. 397.601)
INVOLUNTARY ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
(ss. 397.675-397.6977)
LOCAL ORDINANCE PROHIBITION AND AUTHORIZATION; ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
(ss. 397.701, 397.702)
OFFENDER REFERRALS
(ss. 397.705, 397.706)
INMATE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS
(ss. 397.752-397.754)
SERVICES COORDINATION
(ss. 397.801-397.821)
JUVENILE EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND CHILDREN’S SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES
(ss. 397.901-397.998)
GENERAL PROVISIONS
397.301 Short title.
397.305 Legislative findings, intent, and purpose.
397.311 Definitions.
397.321 Duties of the department.
397.331 Definitions; legislative intent.
397.333 Statewide Drug Policy Advisory Council.
397.334 Treatment-based drug court programs.
397.301 Short title.This act may be cited as the “Hal S. Marchman Alcohol and Other Drug Services Act.”
History.s. 2, ch. 93-39; s. 6, ch. 2009-132.
397.305 Legislative findings, intent, and purpose.
(1) Substance abuse is a major health problem that affects multiple service systems and leads to such profoundly disturbing consequences as serious impairment, chronic addiction, criminal behavior, vehicular casualties, spiraling health care costs, AIDS, and business losses, and significantly affects the culture, socialization, and learning ability of children within our schools and educational systems. Substance abuse impairment is a disease which affects the whole family and the whole society and requires a system of care that includes prevention, intervention, clinical treatment, and recovery support services that support and strengthen the family unit. Further, it is the intent of the Legislature to require the collaboration of state agencies, service systems, and program offices to achieve the goals of this chapter and address the needs of the public; to establish a comprehensive system of care for substance abuse; and to reduce duplicative requirements across state agencies. This chapter is designed to provide for substance abuse services.
(2) It is the goal of the Legislature to discourage substance abuse by promoting healthy lifestyles; healthy families; and drug-free schools, workplaces, and communities.
(3) It is the purpose of this chapter to provide for a comprehensive continuum of accessible and quality substance abuse prevention, intervention, clinical treatment, and recovery support services in the least restrictive environment which promotes long-term recovery while protecting and respecting the rights of individuals, primarily through community-based private not-for-profit providers working with local governmental programs involving a wide range of agencies from both the public and private sectors.
(4) It is the intent of the Legislature to ensure within available resources a full system of care for substance abuse services based on identified needs, delivered without discrimination and with adequate provision for specialized needs.
(5) It is the intent of the Legislature to establish services for individuals with co-occurring substance abuse and mental disorders.
(6) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide an alternative to criminal imprisonment for substance abuse impaired adults and juvenile offenders by encouraging the referral of such offenders to service providers not generally available within the juvenile justice and correctional systems, instead of or in addition to criminal penalties.
(7) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide, within the limits of appropriations and safe management of the juvenile justice and correctional systems, substance abuse services to substance abuse impaired offenders who are placed by the Department of Juvenile Justice or who are incarcerated within the Department of Corrections, in order to better enable these offenders or inmates to adjust to the conditions of society presented to them when their terms of placement or incarceration end.
(8) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide for assisting substance abuse impaired persons primarily through health and other rehabilitative services in order to relieve the police, courts, correctional institutions, and other criminal justice agencies of a burden that interferes with their ability to protect people, apprehend offenders, and maintain safe and orderly communities.
(9) It is the intent of the Legislature that the freedom of religion of all citizens shall be inviolate. Nothing in this act shall give any governmental entity jurisdiction to regulate religious, spiritual, or ecclesiastical services.
History.s. 2, ch. 93-39; s. 7, ch. 2009-132.
397.311 Definitions.As used in this chapter, except part VIII, the term:
(1) “Ancillary services” are services that include, but are not limited to, special diagnostic, prenatal and postnatal, other medical, mental health, legal, economic, vocational, employment, and educational services.
(2) “Authorized agent of the department” means a person designated by the department to conduct any audit, inspection, monitoring, evaluation, or other duty imposed upon the department pursuant to this chapter. An authorized agent must be qualified by expertise and experience to perform these functions.
(3) “Beyond the safe management capabilities of the service provider” refers to an individual who is in need of:
(a) Supervision;
(b) Medical care; or
(c) Services,

beyond that which the service provider or service component can deliver.

(4) “Clinical assessment” means the collection of detailed information concerning an individual’s substance use, emotional and physical health, social roles, and other areas that may reflect the severity of the individual’s abuse of alcohol or drugs. The collection of information serves as a basis for identifying an appropriate treatment regimen.
(5) “Court” means the court of legal jurisdiction in the context in which the term is used in this chapter.
(6) “Department” means the Department of Children and Family Services.
(7) “Director” means the chief administrative or executive officer of a service provider.
(8) “Disclose” or “disclosure” means a communication of identifying information, the affirmative verification of another person’s communication of identifying information, or the communication of any information regarding an individual who has received services. Any disclosure made pursuant to this chapter must be limited to that information which is necessary to carry out the purpose of the disclosure.
(9) “Fee system” means a method of establishing charges for services rendered, in accordance with an individual’s ability to pay, used by providers that receive state funds.
(10) “For profit” means registered as for profit by the Secretary of State and recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a for-profit entity.
(11) “Habitual abuser” means a person who is brought to the attention of law enforcement for being substance impaired, who meets the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675, and who has been taken into custody for such impairment three or more times during the preceding 12 months.
(12) “Hospital” means a hospital or hospital-based component licensed under chapter 395.
(13) “Identifying information” means the name, address, social security number, fingerprints, photograph, and similar information by which the identity of an individual can be determined with reasonable accuracy directly or by reference to other publicly available information.
(14) “Impaired” or “substance abuse impaired” means a condition involving the use of alcoholic beverages or any psychoactive or mood-altering substance in such a manner as to induce mental, emotional, or physical problems and cause socially dysfunctional behavior.
(15) “Individual” means a person who receives alcohol or other drug abuse treatment services delivered by a service provider. The term does not include an inmate pursuant to part VIII of this chapter unless expressly so provided.
(16) “Law enforcement officer” means a law enforcement officer as defined in s. 943.10(1).
(17) “Licensed service provider” means a public agency under this chapter, a private for-profit or not-for-profit agency under this chapter, a physician or any other private practitioner licensed under this chapter, or a hospital that offers substance abuse services through one or more licensed service components.
(18) Licensed service components include a comprehensive continuum of accessible and quality substance abuse prevention, intervention, and clinical treatment services, including the following services:
(a) “Clinical treatment” means a professionally directed, deliberate, and planned regimen of services and interventions that are designed to reduce or eliminate the misuse of drugs and alcohol and promote a healthy, drug-free lifestyle. As defined by rule, “clinical treatment services” include, but are not limited to, the following licensable service components:
1. “Addictions receiving facility” is a secure, acute care facility that provides, at a minimum, detoxification and stabilization services; is operated 24 hours per day, 7 days per week; and is designated by the department to serve individuals found to be substance use impaired as described in s. 397.675 who meet the placement criteria for this component.
2. “Day or night treatment” is a service provided in a nonresidential environment, with a structured schedule of treatment and rehabilitative services.
3. “Day or night treatment with community housing” means a program intended for individuals who can benefit from living independently in peer community housing while participating in treatment services for a minimum of 5 hours a day for a minimum of 25 hours per week.
4. “Detoxification” is a service involving subacute care that is provided on an inpatient or an outpatient basis to assist individuals to withdraw from the physiological and psychological effects of substance abuse and who meet the placement criteria for this component.
5. “Intensive inpatient treatment” includes a planned regimen of evaluation, observation, medical monitoring, and clinical protocols delivered through an interdisciplinary team approach provided 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, in a highly structured, live-in environment.
6. “Intensive outpatient treatment” is a service that provides individual or group counseling in a more structured environment, is of higher intensity and duration than outpatient treatment, and is provided to individuals who meet the placement criteria for this component.
7. “Medication-assisted treatment for opiate addiction” is a service that uses methadone or other medication as authorized by state and federal law, in combination with medical, rehabilitative, and counseling services in the treatment of individuals who are dependent on opioid drugs.
8. “Outpatient treatment” is a service that provides individual, group, or family counseling by appointment during scheduled operating hours for individuals who meet the placement criteria for this component.
9. “Residential treatment” is a service provided in a structured live-in environment within a nonhospital setting on a 24-hours-per-day, 7-days-per-week basis, and is intended for individuals who meet the placement criteria for this component.
(b) “Intervention” means structured services directed toward individuals or groups at risk of substance abuse and focused on reducing or impeding those factors associated with the onset or the early stages of substance abuse and related problems.
(c) “Prevention” means a process involving strategies that are aimed at the individual, family, community, or substance and that preclude, forestall, or impede the development of substance use problems and promote responsible lifestyles.
(19) “Medication-assisted treatment (MAT)” is the use of medications approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, in combination with counseling and behavioral therapies, to provide a holistic approach to the treatment of substance abuse.
(20) “Medical monitoring” means oversight and treatment, 24 hours per day by medical personnel who are licensed under chapter 458, chapter 459, or chapter 464, of individuals whose subacute problems are so severe that the individuals require intensive inpatient treatment by an interdisciplinary team.
(21) “Not for profit” means registered as not for profit by the Secretary of State and recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a not-for-profit entity.
(22) “Physician” means a person licensed under chapter 458 to practice medicine or licensed under chapter 459 to practice osteopathic medicine, and may include, if the context so indicates, an intern or resident enrolled in an intern or resident training program affiliated with an approved medical school, hospital, or other facility through which training programs are normally conducted.
(23) “Physician assistant” means a person licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459 to practice medicine under the supervision of a physician or psychiatrist whose specialty includes substance abuse treatment.
(24) “Private practitioner” means a physician or a physician assistant licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459, a psychologist licensed under chapter 490, or a clinical social worker, marriage and family therapist, or mental health counselor licensed under chapter 491.
(25) “Program evaluation” or “evaluation” means a systematic measurement of a service provider’s achievement of desired individual or service outcomes.
(26) “Qualified professional” means a physician or a physician assistant licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459; a professional licensed under chapter 490 or chapter 491; an advanced registered nurse practitioner having a specialty in psychiatry licensed under part I of chapter 464; or a person who is certified through a department-recognized certification process for substance abuse treatment services and who holds, at a minimum, a bachelor’s degree. A person who is certified in substance abuse treatment services by a state-recognized certification process in another state at the time of employment with a licensed substance abuse provider in this state may perform the functions of a qualified professional as defined in this chapter but must meet certification requirements contained in this subsection no later than 1 year after his or her date of employment.
(27) “Quality improvement” means a systematic and organized approach to monitor and continuously improve the quality of services in order to maintain, restore, or improve outcomes in individuals and populations throughout a system of care.
(28) “Recovery” means a process of personal change through which individuals achieve abstinence from alcohol or drug use and improve health, wellness, and quality of life.
(29) “Recovery support” means services designed to strengthen or assist individuals to regain skills, develop the environmental supports necessary to help the individual thrive in the community, and meet life goals that promote recovery from alcohol and drug use. These services include, but are not limited to, economic, vocational, employment, educational, housing, and other ancillary services.
(30) “Screening” means the gathering of initial information to be used in determining a person’s need for assessment, services, or referral.
(31) “Secure facility,” except where the context indicates a correctional system facility, means a provider that has the authority to deter the premature departure of involuntary individuals whose leaving constitutes a violation of a court order or community-based supervision as provided by law. The term “secure facility” includes addictions receiving facilities and facilities authorized by local ordinance for the treatment of habitual abusers.
(32) “Service component” or “component” means a discrete operational entity within a service provider which is subject to licensing as defined by rule. Service components include prevention, intervention, and clinical treatment described in subsection (18).
(33) “Service provider” or “provider” means a public agency, a private for-profit or not-for-profit agency, a person who is a private practitioner, or a hospital licensed under this chapter or exempt from licensure under this chapter.
(34) “Service provider personnel” or “personnel” includes all owners, directors, chief financial officers, staff, and volunteers, including foster parents, of a service provider.
(35) “Stabilization” means:
(a) Alleviation of a crisis condition; or
(b) Prevention of further deterioration,

and connotes short-term emergency treatment.

(36) “Substance abuse” means the misuse or abuse of, or dependence on alcohol, illicit drugs, or prescription medications. As an individual progresses along this continuum of misuse, abuse, and dependence, there is an increased need for substance abuse intervention and treatment to help abate the problem.
(37) “Substate entity” means a departmental office designated to serve a geographical area specified by the department.
(38) “System of care” means a coordinated continuum of community-based services and supports that are organized to meet the challenges and needs of individuals who are at risk of developing substance abuse problems or individuals who have substance abuse problems.
(39) “Treatment plan” means an immediate and a long-range plan based upon an individual’s assessed needs and used to address and monitor an individual’s recovery from substance abuse.
History.s. 2, ch. 93-39; s. 55, ch. 95-228; s. 1, ch. 98-107; s. 1, ch. 98-262; s. 107, ch. 99-8; s. 52, ch. 2000-139; s. 1, ch. 2002-196; s. 78, ch. 2004-11; s. 2, ch. 2005-55; s. 8, ch. 2009-132; s. 80, ch. 2010-5.
397.321 Duties of the department.The department shall:
(1) Develop a comprehensive state plan for the provision of substance abuse services. The plan must include:
(a) Identification of incidence and prevalence of problems related to substance abuse.
(b) Description of current services.
(c) Need for services.
(d) Cost of services.
(e) Priorities for funding.
(f) Strategies to address the identified needs and priorities.
(g) Resource planning.
(2) Ensure that a plan for substance abuse services is developed at the local substate entity level in accordance with the provisions of part IV of chapter 394.
(3) Provide on a direct or contractual basis, within the context of funds made available by appropriation:
(a) Public education programs and an information clearinghouse to disseminate information about the nature and effects of substance abuse.
(b) Training for personnel who provide substance abuse services.
(c) A data collection and dissemination system, in accordance with applicable federal confidentiality regulations.
(d) Basic epidemiological and statistical research and the dissemination of results.
(e) Research in cooperation with qualified researchers on services delivered pursuant to this chapter.
(4) Establish a funding program for the dissemination of available federal, state, and private funds through contractual agreements with community-based organizations or units of state or local government which deliver local substance abuse services.
(5) Assume responsibility for adopting rules as necessary to comply with this chapter, including other state agencies in this effort, as appropriate.
(6) Assume responsibility for licensing and regulating licensable service components delivering substance abuse services on behalf of service providers pursuant to this chapter.
(7) Ensure that each licensed service provider develops a system and procedures for:
(a) Clinical assessment.
(b) Treatment planning.
(c) Referral.
(d) Progress reviews.
(e) Followup.
(8) Provide for the systematic and comprehensive program evaluation of substance abuse service providers that are state-owned, state-operated, or state-contracted.
(9) Advise the Governor in the preparation of plans to be submitted for federal funding and support.
(10) Provide a system of documentation and reporting commensurate with the requirements of federal and other agencies providing funding to the state.
(11) Provide, within available funds, training and technical assistance to other state agencies relative to the problem of substance abuse and develop joint agreements with other state agencies to enhance the sharing of information and services.
(12) Develop standards for employee assistance programs for employees of state government, local governments, and private business.
(13) Ensure that service provider personnel have background checks as required in this chapter and meet the minimum standards.
(14) In cooperation with service providers, foster and actively seek additional funding to enhance resources for prevention, intervention, clinical treatment, and recovery support services, including, but not limited to, the development of partnerships with:
(a) Private industry.
(b) Intradepartmental and interdepartmental program offices, including, but not limited to, child care services; family safety; delinquency services; health services; economic services; and children’s medical services.
(c) State agencies, including, but not limited to, the Department of Corrections, the Department of Education, the Department of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Elderly Affairs, the Department of Health, the Department of Financial Services, and the Agency for Health Care Administration.
(15) Appoint a substance abuse impairment coordinator to represent the department in efforts initiated by the statewide substance abuse impairment prevention and treatment coordinator established in s. 397.801 and to assist the statewide coordinator in fulfilling the responsibilities of that position.
(16) Recognize a statewide certification process for addiction professionals and identify and endorse one or more agencies responsible for such certification of service provider personnel.
(17) Develop a certification process by rule for community substance abuse prevention coalitions.
(18) Provide sufficient and qualified staff to oversee all contracting, licensing, and planning functions within each of its substate offices, as permitted by legislative appropriation.
(19) Ensure that the department develops and ensures the implementation of procedures between its Substance Abuse Program Office and other departmental programs regarding the referral of substance abuse impaired persons to service providers, information on service providers, information on methods of identifying substance abuse impaired juveniles, and procedures for referring such juveniles to appropriate service providers.
(20) Designate addictions receiving facilities for the purpose of ensuring that only qualified service providers render services within the context of a secure facility setting.
History.s. 2, ch. 93-39; s. 2, ch. 97-208; s. 34, ch. 97-271; s. 6, ch. 98-152; ss. 53, 54, ch. 2000-139; s. 17, ch. 2000-349; s. 9, ch. 2009-132; s. 273, ch. 2011-142.
397.331 Definitions; legislative intent.
(1) As used in this act, the term:
(a) “Substance abuse” means the use of any substance if such use is unlawful or if such use is detrimental to the user or to others, but is not unlawful.
(b) “Substance abuse programs and services” or “drug control” applies generally to the broad continuum of prevention, intervention, clinical treatment, recovery support initiatives, efforts to limit substance abuse, and initiatives and efforts by law enforcement agencies to limit substance abuse.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature to establish and institutionalize a rational process for long-range planning, information gathering, strategic decisionmaking, and funding for the purpose of limiting substance abuse. The Legislature finds that the creation of a Statewide Drug Policy Advisory Council affords the best means of establishing and institutionalizing such a process.
(3) The Legislature finds that any rational and cost-effective governmental effort to address substance abuse must involve a comprehensive, integrated, and multidisciplinary approach to the problem of substance abuse.
(4) The Legislature further finds that because state resources must be available to address an array of state needs, including the funding of drug control efforts, it is critical that:
(a) A state drug control strategy be developed and implemented;
(b) Decisions regarding the funding of substance abuse programs and services be based on the state drug control strategy;
(c) The state drug control strategy be supported by the latest empirical research and data;
(d) The state drug control strategy require performance-based measurement and accountability;
(e) The state drug control strategy require short-term and long-term objectives;
(f) The development and implementation of the state drug control strategy afford a broad spectrum of the public and private sectors an opportunity to comment and make recommendations; and
(g) Because the nature and scope of the substance abuse problem transcends jurisdictional boundaries of any single government agency, the state drug control strategy be a comprehensive, integrated, and multidisciplinary response to the problem of substance abuse.
History.s. 1, ch. 99-187; s. 10, ch. 2009-132; s. 6, ch. 2011-51.
397.333 Statewide Drug Policy Advisory Council.
(1)(a) The Statewide Drug Policy Advisory Council shall be located in the Department of Health. The Surgeon General or his or her designee shall be a nonvoting, ex officio member of the advisory council and shall act as chairperson. The director of the Office of Planning and Budgeting or his or her designee shall be a nonvoting, ex officio member of the advisory council. The Department of Health or its successor agency shall provide staff support for the advisory council.
(b) The following state officials shall be appointed to serve on the advisory council:
1. The Attorney General, or his or her designee.
2. The executive director of the Department of Law Enforcement, or his or her designee.
3. The Secretary of Children and Family Services, or his or her designee.
4. The director of the Office of Planning and Budgeting in the Executive Office of the Governor, or his or her designee.
5. The Secretary of Corrections, or his or her designee.
6. The Secretary of Juvenile Justice, or his or her designee.
7. The Commissioner of Education, or his or her designee.
8. The executive director of the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, or his or her designee.
9. The Adjutant General of the state as the Chief of the Department of Military Affairs, or his or her designee.
(c) In addition, the Governor shall appoint 7 members of the public to serve on the advisory council. Of the 7 appointed members, one member must have professional or occupational expertise in drug enforcement, one member must have professional or occupational expertise in substance abuse prevention, one member must have professional or occupational expertise in substance abuse treatment, and two members must have professional or occupational expertise in faith-based substance abuse treatment services. The remainder of the members appointed should have professional or occupational expertise in, or be generally knowledgeable about, issues that relate to drug enforcement and substance abuse programs and services. The members appointed by the Governor must, to the extent possible, equitably represent all geographic areas of the state.
(d) The President of the Senate shall appoint a member of the Senate to the advisory council and the Speaker of the House of Representatives shall appoint a member of the House of Representatives to the advisory council.
(e) The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court shall appoint a member of the judiciary to the advisory council.
(f) Members appointed by the Governor, the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the Chief Justice shall be appointed to terms of 4 years each. However, for the purpose of providing staggered terms, of the Governor’s initial appointments, five members shall be appointed to 2-year terms and six members shall be appointed to 4-year terms.
(2)(a) Any vacancy on the advisory council shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment, and any member appointed to fill a vacancy occurring because of death, resignation, or ineligibility for membership shall serve only for the unexpired term of the member’s predecessor. A member is eligible for reappointment.
(b) Members of the advisory council and members of workgroups appointed under subsection (4) shall serve without compensation, but are entitled to reimbursement for per diem and travel expenses as provided in s. 112.061.
(c) The advisory council shall meet at least quarterly or upon the call of the chairperson.
(3) The advisory council shall:
(a) Conduct a comprehensive analysis of the problem of substance abuse in this state and make recommendations to the Governor and Legislature for developing and implementing a state drug control strategy. The advisory council shall determine the most effective means of establishing clear and meaningful lines of communication between the advisory council and the public and private sectors in order to ensure that the process of developing and implementing the state drug control strategy has afforded a broad spectrum of the public and private sectors an opportunity to comment and make recommendations.
(b) Review and make recommendations to the Governor and Legislature on funding substance abuse programs and services, consistent with the state drug control strategy, as developed. The council may recommend the creation of a separate appropriations category for funding services delivered or procured by state agencies and may recommend the use of performance-based contracting as provided in s. 414.065.
(c) Review various substance abuse programs and recommend, where needed, measures that are sufficient to determine program outcomes. The council shall review different methodologies for evaluating programs and determine whether programs within different agencies have common outcomes. The methodologies shall be consistent with those established under 1s. 216.0166.
(d) Review the drug control strategies and programs of, and efforts by, other states and the Federal Government and compile the relevant research.
(e) Recommend to the Governor and Legislature applied research projects that would use research capabilities within the state, including, but not limited to, the resources of the State University System, for the purpose of achieving improved outcomes and making better-informed strategic budgetary decisions.
(f) Recommend to the Governor and Legislature changes in law which would remove barriers to or enhance the implementation of the state drug control strategy.
(g) Make recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature on the need for public information campaigns to be conducted in the state to limit substance abuse.
(h) Ensure that there is a coordinated, integrated, and multidisciplinary response to the substance abuse problem in this state, with special attention given to creating partnerships within and between the public and private sectors, and to the coordinated, supported, and integrated delivery of multiple-system services for substance abusers, including a multiagency team approach to service delivery.
(i) Assist communities and families in pooling their knowledge and experiences with respect to the problem of substance abuse. Forums for exchanging ideas, experiences, and practical information, as well as instruction, should be considered. For communities, such instruction may involve issues of funding, staffing, training, and neighborhood and parental involvement, and instruction on other issues. For families, such instruction may involve practical strategies for addressing family substance abuse; improving cognitive, communication, and decisionmaking skills; providing parents with techniques for resolving conflicts, communicating, and cultivating meaningful relationships with their children and establishing guidelines for their children; educating families about drug-free programs and activities in which they may serve as participants and planners; and other programs of similar instruction. To maximize the effectiveness of such forums, multiple agencies should participate.
(j) Examine the extent to which all state programs that involve substance abuse treatment can include a meaningful work component, and identify any change in the law which would remove barriers to or enhance the work component for a substance abuse treatment program.
(k) Recommend to the Governor and the Legislature ways to expand and fund drug courts, which have proven effective in the state’s drug control strategy.
(4)(a) The chairperson of the advisory council shall appoint workgroups that include members of state agencies that are not represented on the advisory council and shall solicit input and recommendations from those state agencies. In addition, the chairperson may appoint workgroups as necessary from among the members of the advisory council in order to efficiently address specific issues. A representative of a state agency appointed to any workgroup shall be the head of the agency, or his or her designee. The chairperson may designate lead and contributing agencies within a workgroup.
(b) The advisory council shall submit a report to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives by December 1 of each year which contains a summary of the work of the council during that year and the recommendations required under subsection (3). Interim reports may be submitted at the discretion of the chairperson of the advisory council.
History.s. 3, ch. 99-187; s. 2, ch. 2001-110; s. 48, ch. 2008-6; s. 8, ch. 2011-51.
1Note.Repealed by s. 61, ch. 2000-371.
397.334 Treatment-based drug court programs.
(1) Each county may fund a treatment-based drug court program under which persons in the justice system assessed with a substance abuse problem will be processed in such a manner as to appropriately address the severity of the identified substance abuse problem through treatment services tailored to the individual needs of the participant. It is the intent of the Legislature to encourage the Department of Corrections, the Department of Children and Family Services, the Department of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Health, the Department of Law Enforcement, the Department of Education, and such agencies, local governments, law enforcement agencies, other interested public or private sources, and individuals to support the creation and establishment of these problem-solving court programs. Participation in the treatment-based drug court programs does not divest any public or private agency of its responsibility for a child or adult, but enables these agencies to better meet their needs through shared responsibility and resources.
(2) Entry into any pretrial treatment-based drug court program shall be voluntary. When neither s. 948.08(6)(a)1. nor 2. applies, the court may order an individual to enter into a pretrial treatment-based drug court program only upon written agreement by the individual, which shall include a statement that the individual understands the requirements of the program and the potential sanctions for noncompliance.
(3)(a) Entry into any postadjudicatory treatment-based drug court program as a condition of probation or community control pursuant to s. 948.01, s. 948.06, or s. 948.20 must be based upon the sentencing court’s assessment of the defendant’s criminal history, substance abuse screening outcome, amenability to the services of the program, total sentence points, the recommendation of the state attorney and the victim, if any, and the defendant’s agreement to enter the program.
(b) An offender who is sentenced to a postadjudicatory drug court program and who, while a drug court participant, is the subject of a violation of probation or community control under s. 948.06 shall have the violation of probation or community control heard by the judge presiding over the postadjudicatory drug court program. The judge shall dispose of any such violation, after a hearing on or admission of the violation, as he or she deems appropriate if the resulting sentence or conditions are lawful.
(4) The treatment-based drug court programs shall include therapeutic jurisprudence principles and adhere to the following 10 key components, recognized by the Drug Courts Program Office of the Office of Justice Programs of the United States Department of Justice and adopted by the Florida Supreme Court Treatment-Based Drug Court Steering Committee:
(a) Drug court programs integrate alcohol and other drug treatment services with justice system case processing.
(b) Using a nonadversarial approach, prosecution and defense counsel promote public safety while protecting participants’ due process rights.
(c) Eligible participants are identified early and promptly placed in the drug court program.
(d) Drug court programs provide access to a continuum of alcohol, drug, and other related treatment and rehabilitation services.
(e) Abstinence is monitored by frequent testing for alcohol and other drugs.
(f) A coordinated strategy governs drug court program responses to participants’ compliance.
(g) Ongoing judicial interaction with each drug court program participant is essential.
(h) Monitoring and evaluation measure the achievement of program goals and gauge program effectiveness.
(i) Continuing interdisciplinary education promotes effective drug court program planning, implementation, and operations.
(j) Forging partnerships among drug court programs, public agencies, and community-based organizations generates local support and enhances drug court program effectiveness.
(5) Treatment-based drug court programs may include pretrial intervention programs as provided in ss. 948.08, 948.16, and 985.345, treatment-based drug court programs authorized in chapter 39, postadjudicatory programs as provided in ss. 948.01, 948.06, and 948.20, and review of the status of compliance or noncompliance of sentenced offenders through a treatment-based drug court program. While enrolled in a treatment-based drug court program, the participant is subject to a coordinated strategy developed by a drug court team under subsection (4). The coordinated strategy may include a protocol of sanctions that may be imposed upon the participant for noncompliance with program rules. The protocol of sanctions may include, but is not limited to, placement in a substance abuse treatment program offered by a licensed service provider as defined in s. 397.311 or in a jail-based treatment program or serving a period of secure detention under chapter 985 if a child or a period of incarceration within the time limits established for contempt of court if an adult. The coordinated strategy must be provided in writing to the participant before the participant agrees to enter into a treatment-based drug court program.
(6)(a) Contingent upon an annual appropriation by the Legislature, each judicial circuit shall establish, at a minimum, one coordinator position for the treatment-based drug court program within the state courts system to coordinate the responsibilities of the participating agencies and service providers. Each coordinator shall provide direct support to the treatment-based drug court program by providing coordination between the multidisciplinary team and the judiciary, providing case management, monitoring compliance of the participants in the treatment-based drug court program with court requirements, and providing program evaluation and accountability.
(b) Each circuit shall report sufficient client-level and programmatic data to the Office of State Courts Administrator annually for purposes of program evaluation. Client-level data include primary offenses that resulted in the drug court referral or sentence, treatment compliance, completion status and reasons for failure to complete, offenses committed during treatment and the sanctions imposed, frequency of court appearances, and units of service. Programmatic data include referral and screening procedures, eligibility criteria, type and duration of treatment offered, and residential treatment resources.
(7)(a) The Florida Association of Drug Court Professionals is created. The membership of the association may consist of treatment-based drug court program practitioners who comprise the multidisciplinary treatment-based drug court program team, including, but not limited to, judges, state attorneys, defense counsel, treatment-based drug court program coordinators, probation officers, law enforcement officers, community representatives, members of the academic community, and treatment professionals. Membership in the association shall be voluntary.
(b) The association shall annually elect a chair whose duty is to solicit recommendations from members on issues relating to the expansion, operation, and institutionalization of treatment-based drug court programs. The chair is responsible for providing on or before October 1 of each year the association’s recommendations and an annual report to the appropriate Supreme Court committee or to the appropriate personnel of the Office of the State Courts Administrator.
(8) If a county chooses to fund a treatment-based drug court program, the county must secure funding from sources other than the state for those costs not otherwise assumed by the state pursuant to s. 29.004. However, this does not preclude counties from using treatment and other service dollars provided through state executive branch agencies. Counties may provide, by interlocal agreement, for the collective funding of these programs.
(9) The chief judge of each judicial circuit may appoint an advisory committee for the treatment-based drug court program. The committee shall be composed of the chief judge, or his or her designee, who shall serve as chair; the judge of the treatment-based drug court program, if not otherwise designated by the chief judge as his or her designee; the state attorney, or his or her designee; the public defender, or his or her designee; the treatment-based drug court program coordinators; community representatives; treatment representatives; and any other persons the chair finds are appropriate.
History.s. 1, ch. 2001-48; s. 109, ch. 2003-402; s. 72, ch. 2004-265; s. 6, ch. 2006-97; s. 108, ch. 2006-120; s. 1, ch. 2009-64; s. 81, ch. 2010-5; s. 1, ch. 2011-33.
SERVICE PROVIDERS
397.401 License required; penalty; injunction; rules waivers.
397.403 License application.
397.405 Exemptions from licensure.
397.406 Licensure and regulation of government-operated substance abuse programs.
397.407 Licensure process; fees.
397.411 Inspection; right of entry; records.
397.415 Denial, suspension, and revocation; other remedies.
397.416 Substance abuse treatment services; qualified professional.
397.419 Quality improvement programs.
397.427 Medication-assisted treatment service providers; rehabilitation program; needs assessment and provision of services; persons authorized to issue takeout medication; unlawful operation; penalty.
397.431 Individual responsibility for cost of substance abuse impairment services.
397.451 Background checks of service provider personnel.
397.461 Unlawful activities relating to personnel; penalties.
397.471 Service provider facility standards.
397.481 Applicability of Community Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services Act.
397.482 Lawyer assistance programs; civil immunity.
397.483 Lawyer assistance programs; presumption of good faith.
397.484 Lawyer assistance programs; persons entitled to immunity.
397.485 Lawyer assistance programs; information subject to privilege.
397.486 Lawyer assistance programs; confidentiality of records, proceedings, and communications.
397.401 License required; penalty; injunction; rules waivers.
(1) It is unlawful for any person or agency to act as a substance abuse service provider unless it is licensed or exempt from licensure under this chapter.
(2) A violation of subsection (1) is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
(3) The department may maintain an action in circuit court to enjoin the unlawful operation of a substance abuse service provider if the department first gives the violator 14 days’ notice of its intent to maintain such action and the violator fails to apply for licensure within that 14-day period. If the department determines that the health, safety, and welfare of individuals are jeopardized, the department may move to enjoin the operation at any time during the 14-day period. If the service provider has already applied for licensure under this chapter and has been denied licensure, the department may move immediately to obtain an injunction.
(4) In accordance with this subsection, the department may waive rules adopted pursuant to this chapter in order to allow service providers to demonstrate and evaluate innovative or cost-effective substance abuse services alternatives. Rules waivers may be granted only in instances where there is reasonable assurance that the health, safety, or welfare of individuals will not be endangered. To apply for a rules waiver, the applicant must be a service provider licensed under this chapter and must submit to the department a written description of the concept to be demonstrated, including:
(a) Objectives and anticipated benefits.
(b) The number and types of individuals who will be affected.
(c) A description of how the demonstration will be evaluated.
(d) Any other information requested by the department.

A service provider granted a rules waiver under this subsection must submit a detailed report of the results of its findings to the department within 12 months after receiving the rules waiver. Upon receiving and evaluating the detailed report, the department may renew or revoke the rules waiver or seek any regulatory or statutory changes necessary to allow other service providers to implement the same alternative service.

(5) The department shall allow a service provider in operation at the time of adoption of any rule a reasonable period, not to exceed 1 year, to bring itself into compliance with the rule.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 11, ch. 2009-132.
397.403 License application.
(1) Applicants for a license under this chapter must apply to the department on forms provided by the department and in accordance with rules adopted by the department. Applications must include at a minimum:
(a) Information establishing the name and address of the applicant service provider and its director, and also of each member, owner, officer, and shareholder, if any.
(b) Information establishing the competency and ability of the applicant service provider and its director to carry out the requirements of this chapter.
(c) Proof satisfactory to the department of the applicant service provider’s financial ability and organizational capability to operate in accordance with this chapter.
(d) Proof of liability insurance coverage in amounts set by the department by rule.
(e) Sufficient information to conduct background screening as provided in s. 397.451.
1. If the results of the background screening indicate that any owner, director, or chief financial officer has been found guilty of, regardless of adjudication, or has entered a plea of nolo contendere or guilty to any offense prohibited under the screening standard, a license may not be issued to the applicant service provider unless an exemption from disqualification has been granted by the department as set forth in chapter 435. The owner, director, or chief financial officer has 90 days within which to obtain the required exemption, during which time the applicant’s license remains in effect.
2. If any owner, director, or chief financial officer is arrested or found guilty of, regardless of adjudication, or has entered a plea of nolo contendere or guilty to any offense prohibited under the screening standard while acting in that capacity, the provider shall immediately remove the person from that position and shall notify the department within 2 days after such removal, excluding weekends and holidays. Failure to remove the owner, director, or chief financial officer will result in revocation of the provider’s license.
(f) Proof of satisfactory fire, safety, and health inspections, and compliance with local zoning ordinances. Service providers operating under a regular annual license shall have 18 months from the expiration date of their regular license within which to meet local zoning requirements. Applicants for a new license must demonstrate proof of compliance with zoning requirements prior to the department issuing a probationary license.
(g) A comprehensive outline of the proposed services for:
1. Any new applicant; or
2. Any licensed service provider adding a new licensable service component.
(2) The burden of proof with respect to any requirement for application for licensure as a service provider under this chapter is on the applicant.
(3) The department shall accept proof of accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities(CARF) or the joint commission, or through any other nationally recognized certification process that is acceptable to the department and meets the minimum licensure requirements under this chapter, in lieu of requiring the applicant to submit the information required by paragraphs (1)(a)-(c).
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 5, ch. 2001-171; s. 6, ch. 2001-191; s. 2, ch. 2002-196; s. 12, ch. 2009-132.
397.405 Exemptions from licensure.The following are exempt from the licensing provisions of this chapter:
(1) A hospital or hospital-based component licensed under chapter 395.
(2) A nursing home facility as defined in s. 400.021.
(3) A substance abuse education program established pursuant to s. 1003.42.
(4) A facility or institution operated by the Federal Government.
(5) A physician or physician assistant licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459.
(6) A psychologist licensed under chapter 490.
(7) A social worker, marriage and family therapist, or mental health counselor licensed under chapter 491.
(8) A legally cognizable church or nonprofit religious organization or denomination providing substance abuse services, including prevention services, which are solely religious, spiritual, or ecclesiastical in nature. A church or nonprofit religious organization or denomination providing any of the licensed service components itemized under s. 397.311(18) is not exempt from substance abuse licensure but retains its exemption with respect to all services which are solely religious, spiritual, or ecclesiastical in nature.
(9) Facilities licensed under chapter 393 which, in addition to providing services to persons with developmental disabilities, also provide services to persons developmentally at risk as a consequence of exposure to alcohol or other legal or illegal drugs while in utero.
(10) DUI education and screening services provided pursuant to ss. 316.192, 316.193, 322.095, 322.271, and 322.291. Persons or entities providing treatment services must be licensed under this chapter unless exempted from licensing as provided in this section.
(11) A facility licensed under s. 394.875 as a crisis stabilization unit.

The exemptions from licensure in this section do not apply to any service provider that receives an appropriation, grant, or contract from the state to operate as a service provider as defined in this chapter or to any substance abuse program regulated pursuant to s. 397.406. Furthermore, this chapter may not be construed to limit the practice of a physician or physician assistant licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459, a psychologist licensed under chapter 490, a psychotherapist licensed under chapter 491, or an advanced registered nurse practitioner licensed under part I of chapter 464, who provides substance abuse treatment, so long as the physician, physician assistant, psychologist, psychotherapist, or advanced registered nurse practitioner does not represent to the public that he or she is a licensed service provider and does not provide services to individuals pursuant to part V of this chapter. Failure to comply with any requirement necessary to maintain an exempt status under this section is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 734, ch. 95-148; s. 65, ch. 97-190; s. 208, ch. 99-13; s. 9, ch. 2000-350; s. 51, ch. 2001-45; s. 31, ch. 2001-62; s. 3, ch. 2002-196; s. 985, ch. 2002-387; s. 91, ch. 2004-267; s. 4, ch. 2005-55; s. 44, ch. 2006-1; s. 40, ch. 2006-227; s. 13, ch. 2009-132.
397.406 Licensure and regulation of government-operated substance abuse programs.Substance abuse programs operated directly or under contract by the department, the Department of Corrections, the Department of Juvenile Justice, any other state agency, or any local correctional agency or authority, which programs constitute any service provider licensable components as defined in this chapter, are subject to licensure and regulation in accordance with rules jointly developed by the department and the state or local agency operating the program. The department has authority to promulgate rules exempting such government-operated programs from specific licensure provisions of this part, including, but not limited to, licensure fees and personnel background checks, and to enforce the regulatory requirements governing such programs.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 14, ch. 2009-132.
397.407 Licensure process; fees.
(1) The department shall establish by rule the licensure process to include fees and categories of licenses. The rule must prescribe a fee range that is based, at least in part, on the number and complexity of programs listed in s. 397.311(18) which are operated by a licensee. The fees from the licensure of service components are sufficient to cover at least 50 percent of the costs of regulating the service components. The department shall specify by rule a fee range for public and privately funded licensed service providers. Fees for privately funded licensed service providers must exceed the fees for publicly funded licensed service providers. During adoption of the rule governing the licensure process and fees, the department shall carefully consider the potential adverse impact on small, not-for-profit service providers.
(2) The department shall assess a fee of $100 per licensed service component for the late filing of an application for renewal of a license.
(3) Licensure and renewal fees must be deposited in the Operations and Maintenance Trust Fund to be used for the actual cost of monitoring, inspecting, and overseeing licensed service providers.
(4) Each application for licensure or renewal must be accompanied by the required fee, except that a service provider that has an all-volunteer staff is exempt from the licensure and renewal fees.
(5) The department may issue probationary, regular, and interim licenses. After adopting the rule governing the licensure process and fees, the department shall issue one license for each service component that is operated by a service provider and defined in rule pursuant to s. 397.311(18). The license is valid only for the specific service components listed for each specific location identified on the license. The licensed service provider shall apply for a new license at least 60 days before the addition of any service components or 30 days before the relocation of any of its service sites. Provision of service components or delivery of services at a location not identified on the license may be considered an unlicensed operation that authorizes the department to seek an injunction against operation as provided in s. 397.401, in addition to other sanctions authorized by s. 397.415. Probationary and regular licenses may be issued only after all required information has been submitted. A license may not be transferred. As used in this subsection, the term “transfer” includes, but is not limited to, the transfer of a majority of the ownership interest in the licensed entity or transfer of responsibilities under the license to another entity by contractual arrangement.
(6) A probationary license may be issued to a service provider applicant in the initial stages of developing services that are not yet fully operational upon completion of all application requirements itemized in s. 397.403(1) and upon demonstration of the applicant’s ability to comply with all applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. A probationary license expires 90 days after issuance and may be reissued once for an additional 90-day period if the applicant has substantially complied with all requirements for regular licensure or has initiated action to satisfy all requirements. During the probationary period the department shall monitor the delivery of services. Notwithstanding s. 120.60(5), the department may order a probationary licensee to cease and desist operations at any time it is found to be substantially out of compliance with licensure standards. This cease-and-desist order is exempt from the requirements of s. 120.60(6).
(7) A regular license may be issued to:
(a) A new applicant at the end of the probationary period.
(b) A licensed applicant that holds a regular license and is seeking renewal.
(c) An applicant for a service component operating under an interim license upon successful satisfaction of the requirements for a regular license.

In order to be issued a regular license, the applicant must be in compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements. Standards and timeframes for the issuance of a regular license must be established by rule. An application for renewal of a regular license must be submitted to the department at least 60 days before the license expires.

(8) The department may issue an interim license to a service provider for a period established by the department which does not exceed 90 days if the department finds that:
(a) A service component of the provider is in substantial noncompliance with licensure standards;
(b) The service provider has failed to provide satisfactory proof of conformance to fire, safety, or health requirements; or
(c) The service provider is involved in license suspension or revocation proceedings.

An interim license applies only to the licensable service component of the provider’s services which is in substantial noncompliance with statutory or regulatory requirements. An interim license expires 90 days after it is issued; however, it may be reissued once for an additional 90-day period in a case of extreme hardship in which the noncompliance is not attributable to the licensed service provider. If the service provider is appealing the final disposition of license suspension or revocation proceedings, the court before which the appeal is taken may order the extension of the interim license for a period specified in the order.

(9) A separate license is required for each service component maintained by the service provider.
(10) The license must be displayed in a conspicuous place inside the facility providing the licensed service component.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 22, ch. 96-418; s. 57, ch. 2000-158; s. 10, ch. 2000-338; s. 4, ch. 2002-196; s. 5, ch. 2005-55; s. 15, ch. 2009-132.
397.411 Inspection; right of entry; records.
(1)(a) An authorized agent of the department may enter and inspect at any time a licensed service provider to determine whether it is in compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements.
(b) An authorized agent of the department may, with the permission of the person in charge of the premises or pursuant to a warrant, enter and inspect any unlicensed service provider it reasonably suspects to be operating in violation of any provision of this chapter.
(c) An application for licensure as a service provider under this chapter constitutes full permission for an authorized agent of the department to enter and inspect the premises of such service provider at any time.
(2) The department shall accept, in lieu of its own inspections for licensure, the survey or inspection of an accrediting organization, if the provider is accredited according to the provisions of s. 394.741 and the department receives the report of the accrediting organization.
(3) Notwithstanding the confidentiality provisions of this chapter, a designated and authorized agent of the department may access the records of the individuals served by licensed service providers, but only for purposes of licensing, monitoring, and investigation. The department may interview individuals, as specified by rule.
(4) The authorized agents of the department shall schedule periodic inspections of licensed service providers in order to minimize costs and the disruption of services; however, such authorized agents may inspect the facilities of any licensed service provider at any time.
(5) In an effort to coordinate inspections among agencies, the department shall notify applicable state agencies of any scheduled licensure inspections of service providers jointly funded by the agencies.
(6) The department shall maintain as public information, available to any person upon request and upon payment of a reasonable charge for copying, copies of licensure reports of licensed providers.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 25, ch. 97-100; s. 4, ch. 2001-171; s. 7, ch. 2001-191; s. 17, ch. 2009-132.
397.415 Denial, suspension, and revocation; other remedies.
(1) If the department determines that an applicant or licensed service provider or licensed service component thereof is not in compliance with all statutory and regulatory requirements, the department may deny, suspend, revoke, or impose reasonable restrictions or penalties on the license or any portion of the license. In such case, the department:
(a) May impose a moratorium on admissions to any service component of a licensed service provider if the department determines that conditions are a threat to the public health or safety.
(b) May impose an administrative penalty of up to $500 per day against a licensed service provider operating in violation of any fire-related, safety-related, or health-related statutory or regulatory requirement. Fines collected under this paragraph must be deposited in the Operations and Maintenance Trust Fund.
(c) May suspend or revoke the license of a service provider or may suspend or revoke the license as to the operation of any service component or location identified on the license if, after notice, the department determines that a service provider has failed to correct the substantial or chronic violation of any statutory or regulatory requirement that impacts the quality of care.
(2) If a provider’s license is revoked, the service provider is barred from submitting any application for licensure of the affected facility or service component to the department for a period of 1 year after the revocation. If the provider’s license is revoked as to any service component or location identified on the license, the provider is barred from applying for licensure of the affected service component or location for 1 year after the revocation.
(3) Proceedings for the denial, suspension, or revocation of a service provider’s license must be conducted in accordance with chapter 120.
(4) The department may maintain an action in court to enjoin the operation of any licensed or unlicensed provider, service component, or location in violation of this chapter or the rules adopted under this chapter.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 18, ch. 2009-132.
397.416 Substance abuse treatment services; qualified professional.Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a person who was certified through a certification process recognized by the former Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services before January 1, 1995, may perform the duties of a qualified professional with respect to substance abuse treatment services as defined in this chapter, and need not meet the certification requirements contained in s. 397.311(26).
History.s. 2, ch. 98-262; s. 5, ch. 2002-196; s. 60, ch. 2005-2; s. 6, ch. 2005-55; s. 19, ch. 2009-132.
397.419 Quality improvement programs.
(1) Each service provider must maintain a quality improvement program to objectively and systematically monitor and evaluate the appropriateness and quality of care, to ensure that services are rendered consistent with prevailing professional standards, and to identify and resolve problems.
(2) For each service provider, a written plan must be developed with a copy made available upon request to the department which addresses the minimum guidelines for the provider’s quality improvement program, including, but not limited to:
(a) Individual care and services standards.
(b) Individual records maintenance procedures.
(c) Staff development policies and procedures.
(d) Service-environment safety and maintenance standards.
(e) Peer review and utilization management review procedures.
(f) Incident reporting policies and procedures that include verification of corrective action, provision for reporting to the department within a time period prescribed by rule, documentation that incident reporting is the affirmative duty of all staff, and a provision that specifies that a person who files an incident report may not be subjected to any civil action by virtue of that incident report.
(3) The quality improvement program is the responsibility of the director and is subject to review and approval by the governing board of the service provider.
(4) Each director shall designate a person who is an employee of or under contract with the service provider as the provider’s quality improvement manager.
(5) The department may access all service provider records necessary to determine compliance with this section. Records relating solely to actions taken in carrying out this section and records obtained by the department to determine a provider’s compliance with this section are confidential and exempt from s. 119.07(1) and s. 24(a), Art. I of the State Constitution. Such records are not admissible in any civil or administrative action except in disciplinary proceedings by the Department of Health or the appropriate regulatory board, and are not part of the record of investigation and prosecution in disciplinary proceedings made available to the public by the Department of Health or the appropriate regulatory board. Meetings or portions of meetings of quality improvement program committees that relate solely to actions taken pursuant to this section are exempt from s. 286.011.
(6) The quality improvement program must also:
(a) Provide a framework for evaluating outcomes, including:
1. Output measures, such as capacities, technologies, and infrastructure, that make up the system of care.
2. Process measures, such as administrative and clinical components of treatment.
3. Outcome measures pertaining to the outcomes of services;
(b) Provide for a system of analyzing those factors which have an effect on performance at the local level;
(c) Provide for a system of reporting the results of quality improvement reviews; and
(d) Incorporate best practice models for use in improving performance in those areas which are deficient.
(7) Contingent upon specific appropriation, a quality improvement coordinator position shall be established within each substate entity to oversee the implementation and operation of the quality improvement program.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 45, ch. 94-218; s. 1, ch. 95-407; s. 221, ch. 96-406; s. 5, ch. 99-396; s. 20, ch. 2009-132.
397.427 Medication-assisted treatment service providers; rehabilitation program; needs assessment and provision of services; persons authorized to issue takeout medication; unlawful operation; penalty.
(1) Providers of medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction may not be licensed unless they provide supportive rehabilitation programs. Supportive rehabilitation programs include, but are not limited to, counseling, therapy, and vocational rehabilitation.
(2) The department shall determine the need for establishing providers of medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction.
(a) Providers of medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction may be established only in response to the department’s determination and publication of need for additional medication treatment services.
(b) The department shall prescribe by rule the types of medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction for which it is necessary to conduct annual assessments of need. If needs assessment is required, the department shall annually conduct the assessment and publish a statement of findings which identifies each substate entity’s need.
(c) Notwithstanding paragraphs (a) and (b), the license for medication-assisted treatment programs for opiate addiction licensed before October 1, 1990, may not be revoked solely because of the department’s determination concerning the need for medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction.
(3) The department shall adopt rules necessary to administer this section, including, but not limited to, rules prescribing criteria and procedures for:
(a) Determining the need for additional medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction.
(b) Selecting providers for medication-assisted treatment services for opiate addiction when the number of responses to a publication of need exceeds the determined need.
(c) Administering any federally required rules, regulations, or procedures.
(4) A service provider operating in violation of this section is subject to proceedings in accordance with this chapter to enjoin that unlawful operation.
(5) Notwithstanding s. 465.019(2), a physician assistant, a registered nurse, an advanced registered nurse practitioner, or a licensed practical nurse working for a licensed service provider may deliver takeout medication for opiate treatment to persons enrolled in a maintenance treatment program for medication-assisted treatment for opiate addiction if:
(a) The medication-assisted treatment program for opiate addiction has an appropriate valid permit issued pursuant to rules adopted by the Board of Pharmacy;
(b) The medication for treatment of opiate addiction has been delivered pursuant to a valid prescription written by the program’s physician licensed pursuant to chapter 458 or chapter 459;
(c) The medication for treatment of opiate addiction which is ordered appears on a formulary and is prepackaged and prelabeled with dosage instructions and distributed from a source authorized under chapter 499;
(d) Each licensed provider adopts written protocols which provide for supervision of the physician assistant, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse by a physician licensed pursuant to chapter 458 or chapter 459 and for the procedures by which patients’ medications may be delivered by the physician assistant, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse. Such protocols shall be signed by the supervising physician and either the administering registered nurse, the advanced registered nurse practitioner, or the licensed practical nurse.
(e) Each licensed service provider maintains and has available for inspection by representatives of the Board of Pharmacy all medical records and patient care protocols, including records of medications delivered to patients, in accordance with the board.
(6) The department shall also determine the need for establishing medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorders other than opiate dependence. Service providers within the publicly funded system shall be funded for provision of these services based on the availability of funds.
(7) Service providers that provide medication-assisted treatment for substance abuse other than opiate dependence shall provide counseling services in conjunction with medication-assisted treatment.
(8) The department shall adopt rules necessary to administer medication-assisted treatment services, including, but not limited to, rules prescribing criteria and procedures for:
(a) Determining the need for medication-assisted treatment services within the publicly funded system.
(b) Selecting medication-assisted service providers within the publicly funded system.
(c) Administering any federally required rules, regulations, or procedures related to the provision of medication-assisted treatment.
(9) A physician assistant, a registered nurse, an advanced registered nurse practitioner, or a licensed practical nurse working for a licensed service provider may deliver medication as prescribed by rule if:
(a) The service provider is authorized to provide medication-assisted treatment;
(b) The medication has been administered pursuant to a valid prescription written by the program’s physician who is licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459; and
(c) The medication ordered appears on a formulary or meets federal requirements for medication-assisted treatment.
(10) Each licensed service provider that provides medication-assisted treatment must adopt written protocols as specified by the department and in accordance with federally required rules, regulations, or procedures. The protocol shall provide for the supervision of the physician assistant, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse working under the supervision of a physician who is licensed under chapter 458 or chapter 459. The protocol must specify how the medication will be used in conjunction with counseling or psychosocial treatment and that the services provided will be included on the treatment plan. The protocol must specify the procedures by which medication-assisted treatment may be administered by the physician assistant, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse. These protocols shall be signed by the supervising physician and the administering physician assistant, registered nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed practical nurse.
(11) Each licensed service provider shall maintain and have available for inspection by representatives of the Board of Pharmacy all medical records and protocols, including records of medications delivered to individuals in accordance with rules of the board.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 7, ch. 98-152; s. 21, ch. 2009-132.
397.431 Individual responsibility for cost of substance abuse impairment services.
(1) Before accepting an individual for admission and in accordance with confidentiality guidelines, both the full charge for services and the fee charged to the individual for such services under the provider’s fee system or payment policy must be disclosed to each individual or his or her authorized personal representative, or parent or legal guardian if the individual is a minor who did not seek treatment voluntarily and without parental consent.
(2) An individual or his or her authorized personal representative, or parent or legal guardian if the individual is a minor, is required to contribute toward the cost of substance abuse services in accordance with his or her ability to pay, unless otherwise provided by law.
(3) The parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian of a minor is not liable for payment for any substance abuse services provided to the minor without parental consent pursuant to s. 397.601(4), unless the parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian participates or is ordered to participate in the services, and only for the substance abuse services rendered. If the minor is receiving services as a juvenile offender, the obligation to pay is governed by the law relating to juvenile offenders.
(4) Service providers that do not contract for state funds to provide substance abuse services as defined in this chapter may establish their own admission policies regarding provisions for payment for services. Such policies must comply with other statutory and regulatory requirements governing state or federal reimbursements to a provider for services delivered to individuals. As used in this subsection, the term “contract for state funds” does not include Medicaid funds.
(5) Service providers that contract for state funds to provide substance abuse services as defined in this chapter must establish a fee system based upon an individual’s ability to pay and, if space and sufficient state resources are available, may not deny an individual access to services solely on the basis of the individual’s inability to pay.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 735, ch. 95-148; s. 22, ch. 2009-132.
397.451 Background checks of service provider personnel.
(1) PERSONNEL BACKGROUND CHECKS; REQUIREMENTS AND EXCEPTIONS.
(a) Background checks shall apply as follows:
1. All owners, directors, and chief financial officers of service providers are subject to level 2 background screening as provided under chapter 435. Inmate substance abuse programs operated directly or under contract with the Department of Corrections are exempt from this requirement.
2. All service provider personnel who have direct contact with children receiving services or with adults who are developmentally disabled receiving services are subject to level 2 background screening as provided under chapter 435.
(b) Members of a foster family and persons residing with the foster family who are between 12 and 18 years of age are not required to be fingerprinted but must have their backgrounds checked for delinquency records. Members of the foster family and persons residing with the foster family over 18 years of age are subject to full background checks.
(c) A volunteer who assists on an intermittent basis for fewer than 40 hours per month and is under direct and constant supervision by persons who meet all personnel requirements of this chapter is exempt from fingerprinting and background check requirements.
(d) Service providers that are exempt from licensing provisions of this chapter are exempt from personnel fingerprinting and background check requirements, except as otherwise provided in this section. A church or nonprofit religious organization exempt from licensure under this chapter is required to comply with personnel fingerprinting and background check requirements.
(e) Personnel employed directly or under contract with the Department of Corrections in an inmate substance abuse program who have direct contact with unmarried inmates under the age of 18 or with inmates who are developmentally disabled are exempt from the fingerprinting and background check requirements of this section.
(f) Service provider personnel who request an exemption from disqualification must submit the request within 30 days after being notified of the disqualification. Upon notification of the disqualification, the service provider shall comply with requirements regarding exclusion from employment in s. 435.06.
(g) The department may not issue a regular license to any service provider that fails to provide proof that background screening information has been submitted in accordance with chapter 435.
(2) EMPLOYMENT HISTORY CHECKS; CHECKS OF REFERENCES.The department shall assess employment history checks and checks of references for all owners, directors, and chief financial officers, and the directors shall assess employment history checks and checks of references for each employee who has direct contact with children receiving services or adults who are developmentally disabled receiving services.
(3) PERSONNEL EXEMPT FROM BEING REFINGERPRINTED OR RECHECKED.
(a) Service provider personnel who have been fingerprinted or had their backgrounds checked pursuant to chapter 393, chapter 394, chapter 402, or chapter 409, or this section, and teachers who have been fingerprinted pursuant to chapter 1012, who have not been unemployed for more than 90 days thereafter and who, under the penalty of perjury, attest to the completion of such fingerprinting or background checks and to compliance with the provisions of this section and the standards contained in chapter 435 and this section, are not required to be refingerprinted or rechecked.
(b) Service provider owners, directors, or chief financial officers who are not covered by paragraph (a) who provide proof of compliance with the level 2 background screening requirements which has been submitted within the previous 5 years in compliance with any other state health care licensure requirements are not required to be refingerprinted or rechecked.
(4) EXEMPTIONS FROM DISQUALIFICATION.
(a) The department may grant to any service provider personnel an exemption from disqualification as provided in s. 435.07.
(b) Since rehabilitated substance abuse impaired persons are effective in the successful treatment and rehabilitation of substance abuse impaired adolescents, for service providers which treat adolescents 13 years of age and older, service provider personnel whose background checks indicate crimes under s. 817.563, s. 893.13, or s. 893.147 may be exempted from disqualification from employment pursuant to this paragraph.
(c) The department may grant exemptions from disqualification which would limit service provider personnel to working with adults in substance abuse treatment facilities.
(5) PAYMENT FOR PROCESSING OF FINGERPRINTS AND STATE CRIMINAL RECORDS CHECKS.The employing service provider or the personnel who are having their backgrounds checked are responsible for paying the costs of processing fingerprints and criminal records checks.
(6) DISQUALIFICATION FROM RECEIVING STATE FUNDS.State funds may not be disseminated to any service provider owned or operated by an owner, director, or chief financial officer who has been convicted of, has entered a plea of guilty or nolo contendere to, or has had adjudication withheld for, a violation of s. 893.135 pertaining to trafficking in controlled substances, or a violation of the law of another state, the District of Columbia, the United States or any possession or territory thereof, or any foreign jurisdiction which is substantially similar in elements and penalties to a trafficking offense in this state, unless the owner’s or director’s civil rights have been restored.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 20, ch. 94-134; s. 20, ch. 94-135; s. 46, ch. 94-218; s. 16, ch. 95-152; s. 13, ch. 95-158; s. 36, ch. 95-228; s. 2, ch. 95-407; s. 126, ch. 95-418; s. 9, ch. 96-268; s. 222, ch. 96-406; s. 10, ch. 99-188; s. 12, ch. 2000-320; s. 6, ch. 2002-196; s. 1, ch. 2002-212; s. 986, ch. 2002-387; s. 45, ch. 2004-267; s. 7, ch. 2005-128; s. 6, ch. 2006-171; s. 23, ch. 2009-132.
397.461 Unlawful activities relating to personnel; penalties.It is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083, for any person willfully, knowingly, or intentionally to:
(1) Inaccurately disclose by false statement, misrepresentation, impersonation, or other fraudulent means, or fail to disclose, in any application for voluntary or paid employment, any fact which is material in making a determination as to the person’s qualifications to be an owner, a director, a volunteer, or other personnel of a service provider;
(2) Operate or attempt to operate as a service provider with personnel who are in noncompliance with the minimum standards contained in this chapter; or
(3) Use or release any criminal or juvenile information obtained under this chapter for any purpose other than background checks of personnel for employment.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 69, ch. 2000-349.
397.471 Service provider facility standards.
(1) Each service provider must ensure:
(a) Sufficient numbers and types of qualified personnel on duty and available to provide necessary and adequate safety and care.
(b) Adequate space for each individual served within a residential facility.
(c) Adequate infection control, housekeeping, and sanitation.
(d) Adequate disaster planning policies and procedures.
(2) The State Fire Marshal shall, in cooperation with the department, establish and enforce minimum firesafety standards, which standards must be included in the rules adopted by the department.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39; s. 24, ch. 2009-132.
397.481 Applicability of Community Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services Act.All service providers as defined in and governed by this chapter are also subject to part IV of chapter 394, the Community Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services Act.
History.s. 3, ch. 93-39.
397.482 Lawyer assistance programs; civil immunity.A person who in good faith reports information or takes action in connection with a lawyer assistance program or a person who receives information in connection with a lawyer assistance program is immune from civil liability for reporting the information, taking the action, or taking no action, provided that such person has acted in good faith and without malice.
History.s. 1, ch. 2001-240.
397.483 Lawyer assistance programs; presumption of good faith.A member of a lawyer assistance program or a person reporting information to a lawyer assistance program is presumed to have acted in good faith and without malice. A person alleging lack of good faith has the burden of proving bad faith and malice.
History.s. 2, ch. 2001-240.
397.484 Lawyer assistance programs; persons entitled to immunity.The civil immunity provided for in this act shall be liberally construed to accomplish the purposes of this act. The persons entitled to immunity under this act include:
(1) Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc., and other lawyer assistance programs approved by the Florida Supreme Court or The Florida Bar which provide assistance to attorneys who may be impaired because of abuse of alcohol or other drugs or because of any other physical or mental infirmity causing impairment.
(2) A member, employee, or agent of the program, association, or nonprofit corporation.
(3) A person who reports or provides information to the program concerning an impaired legal professional, including, but not limited to, a person designated to monitor or supervise the course of treatment or rehabilitation of an impaired professional.
History.s. 3, ch. 2001-240.
397.485 Lawyer assistance programs; information subject to privilege.All privileged information, whether attorney-client, work product, or otherwise, in any form, furnished to the lawyer assistance program shall remain privileged.
History.s. 4, ch. 2001-240.
397.486 Lawyer assistance programs; confidentiality of records, proceedings, and communications.The records, proceedings, and all communications by and between an individual seeking assistance and the lawyer assistance program shall be deemed confidential and shall not be subject to disclosure or available for court subpoena. This section does not prevent the subpoena of business records that are otherwise available through subpoena, nor does this section preclude release or disclosure of information or communications by the lawyer assistance program when such disclosure is mandated or required as a condition or precondition for entry in the program. Such records are not to be construed as privileged merely because they have been maintained by a lawyer assistance program.
History.s. 5, ch. 2001-240.
CLIENT RIGHTS
397.501 Rights of individuals.
397.581 Unlawful activities relating to assessment and treatment; penalties.
397.501 Rights of individuals.Individuals receiving substance abuse services from any service provider are guaranteed protection of the rights specified in this section, unless otherwise expressly provided, and service providers must ensure the protection of such rights.
(1) RIGHT TO INDIVIDUAL DIGNITY.The dignity of the individual served must be respected at all times and upon all occasions, including any occasion when the individual is admitted, retained, or transported. Individuals served who are not accused of a crime or delinquent act may not be detained or incarcerated in jails, detention centers, or training schools of the state, except for purposes of protective custody in strict accordance with this chapter. An individual may not be deprived of any constitutional right.
(2) RIGHT TO NONDISCRIMINATORY SERVICES.
(a) Service providers may not deny an individual access to substance abuse services solely on the basis of race, gender, ethnicity, age, sexual preference, human immunodeficiency virus status, prior service departures against medical advice, disability, or number of relapse episodes. Service providers may not deny an individual who takes medication prescribed by a physician access to substance abuse services solely on that basis. Service providers who receive state funds to provide substance abuse services may not, if space and sufficient state resources are available, deny access to services based solely on inability to pay.
(b) Each individual in treatment must be afforded the opportunity to participate in the formulation and periodic review of his or her individualized treatment or service plan to the extent of his or her ability to so participate.
(c) It is the policy of the state to use the least restrictive and most appropriate services available, based on the needs and the best interests of the individual and consistent with optimum care of the individual.
(d) Each individual must be afforded the opportunity to participate in activities designed to enhance self-image.
(3) RIGHT TO QUALITY SERVICES.
(a) Each individual must be delivered services suited to his or her needs, administered skillfully, safely, humanely, with full respect for his or her dignity and personal integrity, and in accordance with all statutory and regulatory requirements.
(b) These services must include the use of methods and techniques to control aggressive behavior that poses an immediate threat to the individual or to other persons. Such methods and techniques include the use of restraints, the use of seclusion, the use of time-out, and other behavior management techniques. When authorized, these methods and techniques may be applied only by persons who are employed by service providers and trained in the application and use of these methods and techniques. The department must specify by rule the methods that may be used and the techniques that may be applied by service providers to control aggressive behavior and must specify by rule the physical facility requirements for seclusion rooms, including dimensions, safety features, methods of observation, and contents.
(4) RIGHT TO COMMUNICATION.
(a) Each individual has the right to communicate freely and privately with other persons within the limitations imposed by service provider policy.
(b) Because the delivery of services can only be effective in a substance abuse free environment, close supervision of each individual’s communications and correspondence is necessary, particularly in the initial stages of treatment, and the service provider must therefore set reasonable rules for telephone, mail, and visitation rights, giving primary consideration to the well-being and safety of individuals, staff, and the community. It is the duty of the service provider to inform the individual and his or her family if the family is involved at the time of admission about the provider’s rules relating to communications and correspondence.
(5) RIGHT TO CARE AND CUSTODY OF PERSONAL EFFECTS.An individual has the right to possess clothing and other personal effects. The service provider may take temporary custody of the individual’s personal effects only when required for medical or safety reasons, with the reason for taking custody and a list of the personal effects recorded in the individual’s clinical record.
(6) RIGHT TO EDUCATION OF MINORS.Each minor in a residential service component is guaranteed education and training appropriate to his or her needs. The service provider shall coordinate with local education agencies to ensure that education and training is provided to each minor in accordance with other applicable laws and regulations and that parental responsibilities related to such education and training are established within the provisions of such applicable laws and regulations. This chapter does not relieve any local education authority of its obligation under law to provide a free and appropriate education to every child.
(7) RIGHT TO CONFIDENTIALITY OF INDIVIDUAL RECORDS.
(a) The records of service providers which pertain to the identity, diagnosis, and prognosis of and service provision to any individual are confidential in accordance with this chapter and with applicable federal confidentiality regulations and are exempt from s. 119.07(1) and s. 24(a), Art. I of the State Constitution. Such records may not be disclosed without the written consent of the individual to whom they pertain except that appropriate disclosure may be made without such consent:
1. To medical personnel in a medical emergency.
2. To service provider personnel if such personnel need to know the information in order to carry out duties relating to the provision of services to an individual.
3. To the secretary of the department or the secretary’s designee, for purposes of scientific research, in accordance with federal confidentiality regulations, but only upon agreement in writing that the individual’s name and other identifying information will not be disclosed.
4. In the course of review of service provider records by persons who are performing an audit or evaluation on behalf of any federal, state, or local government agency, or third-party payor providing financial assistance or reimbursement to the service provider; however, reports produced as a result of such audit or evaluation may not disclose names or other identifying information and must be in accordance with federal confidentiality regulations.
5. Upon court order based on application showing good cause for disclosure. In determining whether there is good cause for disclosure, the court shall examine whether the public interest and the need for disclosure outweigh the potential injury to the individual, to the service provider and the individual, and to the service provider itself.
(b) The restrictions on disclosure and use in this section do not apply to communications from provider personnel to law enforcement officers which:
1. Are directly related to an individual’s commission of a crime on the premises of the provider or against provider personnel or to a threat to commit such a crime; and
2. Are limited to the circumstances of the incident, including the status of the individual committing or threatening to commit the crime, that individual’s name and address, and that individual’s last known whereabouts.
(c) The restrictions on disclosure and use in this section do not apply to the reporting of incidents of suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate state or local authorities as required by law. However, such restrictions continue to apply to the original substance abuse records maintained by the provider, including their disclosure and use for civil or criminal proceedings which may arise out of the report of suspected child abuse and neglect.
(d) Any answer to a request for a disclosure of individual records which is not permissible under this section or under the appropriate federal regulations must be made in a way that will not affirmatively reveal that an identified individual has been, or is being diagnosed or treated for substance abuse. The regulations do not restrict a disclosure that an identified individual is not and has never received services.
(e)1. Since a minor acting alone has the legal capacity to voluntarily apply for and obtain substance abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure may be given only by the minor. This restriction includes, but is not limited to, any disclosure of identifying information to the parent, legal guardian, or custodian of a minor for the purpose of obtaining financial reimbursement.
2. When the consent of a parent, legal guardian, or custodian is required under this chapter in order for a minor to obtain substance abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure must be given by both the minor and the parent, legal guardian, or custodian.
(f) An order of a court of competent jurisdiction authorizing disclosure and use of confidential information is a unique kind of court order. Its only purpose is to authorize a disclosure or use of identifying information which would otherwise be prohibited by this section. Such an order does not compel disclosure. A subpoena or a similar legal mandate must be issued in order to compel disclosure. This mandate may be entered at the same time as, and accompany, an authorizing court order entered under this section.
(g) An order authorizing the disclosure of an individual’s records may be applied for by any person having a legally recognized interest in the disclosure which is sought. The application may be filed separately or as part of a pending civil action in which it appears that the individual’s records are needed to provide evidence. An application must use a fictitious name, such as John Doe or Jane Doe, to refer to any individual and may not contain or otherwise disclose any identifying information unless the individual is the applicant or has given a written consent to disclosure or the court has ordered the record of the proceeding sealed from public scrutiny.
(h) The individual and the person holding the records from whom disclosure is sought must be given adequate notice in a manner which will not disclose identifying information to other persons, and an opportunity to file a written response to the application, or to appear in person, for the limited purpose of providing evidence on the statutory and regulatory criteria for the issuance of the court order.
(i) Any oral argument, review of evidence, or hearing on the application must be held in the judge’s chambers or in some manner which ensures that identifying information is not disclosed to anyone other than a party to the proceeding, the individual, or the person holding the record, unless the individual requests an open hearing. The proceeding may include an examination by the judge of the records referred to in the application.
(j) A court may authorize the disclosure and use of records for the purpose of conducting a criminal investigation or prosecution of an individual only if the court finds that all of the following criteria are met:
1. The crime involved is extremely serious, such as one which causes or directly threatens loss of life or serious bodily injury, including but not limited to homicide, sexual assault, sexual battery, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect.
2. There is reasonable likelihood that the records will disclose information of substantial value in the investigation or prosecution.
3. Other ways of obtaining the information are not available or would not be effective.
4. The potential injury to the individual, to the physician-individual relationship, and to the ability of the program to provide services to other individuals is outweighed by the public interest and the need for the disclosure.
(8) RIGHT TO COUNSEL.Each individual must be informed that he or she has the right to be represented by counsel in any involuntary proceeding for assessment, stabilization, or treatment and that he or she, or if the individual is a minor his or her parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian, may apply immediately to the court to have an attorney appointed if he or she cannot afford one.
(9) RIGHT TO HABEAS CORPUS.At any time, and without notice, an individual involuntarily retained by a provider, or the individual’s parent, guardian, custodian, or attorney on behalf of the individual, may petition for a writ of habeas corpus to question the cause and legality of such retention and request that the court issue a writ for the individual’s release.
(10) LIABILITY AND IMMUNITY.
(a) Service provider personnel who violate or abuse any right or privilege of an individual under this chapter are liable for damages as determined by law.
(b) All persons acting in good faith, reasonably, and without negligence in connection with the preparation or execution of petitions, applications, certificates, or other documents or the apprehension, detention, discharge, examination, transportation, or treatment of a person under the provisions of this chapter shall be free from all liability, civil or criminal, by reason of such acts.
History.s. 4, ch. 93-39; s. 736, ch. 95-148; s. 3, ch. 95-407; s. 223, ch. 96-406; s. 2, ch. 98-107; s. 25, ch. 2009-132.
397.581 Unlawful activities relating to assessment and treatment; penalties.
(1) Knowingly furnishing false information for the purpose of obtaining emergency or other involuntary admission for any person is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 and by a fine not exceeding $5,000.
(2) Causing or otherwise securing, or conspiring with or assisting another to cause or secure, without reason for believing a person to be impaired, any emergency or other involuntary procedure for the person is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 and by a fine not exceeding $5,000.
(3) Causing, or conspiring with or assisting another to cause, the denial to any person of any right accorded pursuant to this chapter is a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 and by a fine not exceeding $5,000.
History.s. 4, ch. 93-39; s. 26, ch. 2009-132.
VOLUNTARY ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
397.601 Voluntary admissions.
397.601 Voluntary admissions.
(1) A person who wishes to enter treatment for substance abuse may apply to a service provider for voluntary admission.
(2) Within the financial and space capabilities of the service provider, a person must be admitted to treatment when sufficient evidence exists that the person is impaired by substance abuse and the medical and behavioral conditions of the person are not beyond the safe management capabilities of the service provider.
(3) The service provider must emphasize admission to the service component that represents the least restrictive setting that is appropriate to the person’s treatment needs.
(4)(a) The disability of minority for persons under 18 years of age is removed solely for the purpose of obtaining voluntary substance abuse impairment services from a licensed service provider, and consent to such services by a minor has the same force and effect as if executed by an individual who has reached the age of majority. Such consent is not subject to later disaffirmance based on minority.
(b) Except for purposes of law enforcement activities in connection with protective custody, the disability of minority is not removed if there is an involuntary admission for substance abuse services, in which case parental participation may be required as the court finds appropriate.
History.s. 5, ch. 93-39; s. 27, ch. 2009-132.
INVOLUNTARY ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
A. General Provisions
B. Noncourt Involved Admissions:
Protective Custody
C. Noncourt Involved Admissions;
Emergency
D. Noncourt Involved Admissions;
Alternative Involuntary
Assessment for Minors
E. Court Involved Admissions, Civil
Involuntary Proceedings; Generally
F. Court Involved Admissions;
Involuntary Assessment; Stabilization
G. Court Involved Admissions;
Involuntary Treatment
A. General Provisions
397.675 Criteria for involuntary admissions, including protective custody, emergency admission, and other involuntary assessment, involuntary treatment, and alternative involuntary assessment for minors, for purposes of assessment and stabilization, and for involuntary treatment.
397.6751 Service provider responsibilities regarding involuntary admissions.
397.6752 Referral of involuntarily admitted individual for voluntary treatment.
397.6758 Release of individual from protective custody, emergency admission, involuntary assessment, involuntary treatment, and alternative involuntary assessment of a minor.
397.6759 Parental participation in treatment.
397.675 Criteria for involuntary admissions, including protective custody, emergency admission, and other involuntary assessment, involuntary treatment, and alternative involuntary assessment for minors, for purposes of assessment and stabilization, and for involuntary treatment.A person meets the criteria for involuntary admission if there is good faith reason to believe the person is substance abuse impaired and, because of such impairment:
(1) Has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance use; and either
(2)(a) Has inflicted, or threatened or attempted to inflict, or unless admitted is likely to inflict, physical harm on himself or herself or another; or
(b) Is in need of substance abuse services and, by reason of substance abuse impairment, his or her judgment has been so impaired that the person is incapable of appreciating his or her need for such services and of making a rational decision in regard thereto; however, mere refusal to receive such services does not constitute evidence of lack of judgment with respect to his or her need for such services.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 737, ch. 95-148.
397.6751 Service provider responsibilities regarding involuntary admissions.
(1) It is the responsibility of the service provider to:
(a) Ensure that a person who is admitted to a licensed service component meets the admission criteria specified in s. 397.675;
(b) Ascertain whether the medical and behavioral conditions of the person, as presented, are beyond the safe management capabilities of the service provider;
(c) Provide for the admission of the person to the service component that represents the least restrictive available setting that is responsive to the person’s treatment needs;
(d) Verify that the admission of the person to the service component does not result in a census in excess of its licensed service capacity;
(e) Determine whether the cost of services is within the financial means of the person or those who are financially responsible for the person’s care; and
(f) Take all necessary measures to ensure that each individual in treatment is provided with a safe environment, and to ensure that each individual whose medical condition or behavioral problem becomes such that he or she cannot be safely managed by the service component is discharged and referred to a more appropriate setting for care.
(2)(a) When, in the judgment of the service provider, the person who is being presented for involuntary admission should not be admitted because of his or her failure to meet admission criteria, because his or her medical or behavioral conditions are beyond the safe management capabilities of the service provider, or because of a lack of available space, services, or financial resources to pay for his or her care, the service provider, in accordance with federal confidentiality regulations, must attempt to contact the referral source, which may be a law enforcement officer, physician, parent, legal guardian if applicable, court and petitioner, or other referring party, to discuss the circumstances and assist in arranging for alternative interventions.
(b) When the service provider is unable to reach the referral source, the service provider must refuse admission and attempt to assist the person in gaining access to other appropriate services, if indicated.
(c) Upon completing these efforts, the service provider must, within one workday, report in writing to the referral sources, in compliance with federal confidentiality regulations:
1. The basis for the refusal to admit the person, and
2. Documentation of the service provider’s efforts to contact the referral source and assist the person, when indicated, in gaining access to more appropriate services.
(3) When, in the judgment of the service provider, the medical conditions or behavioral problems of an involuntary individual become such that they cannot be safely managed by the service component, the service provider must discharge the individual and attempt to assist him or her in securing more appropriate services in a setting more responsive to his or her needs. Upon completing these efforts, the service provider must, within 72 hours, report in writing to the referral source, in compliance with federal confidentiality regulations:
(a) The basis for the individual’s discharge; and
(b) Documentation of the service provider’s efforts to assist the person in gaining access to appropriate services.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 738, ch. 95-148; s. 28, ch. 2009-132.
397.6752 Referral of involuntarily admitted individual for voluntary treatment.Upon giving his or her written informed consent, an involuntarily admitted individual may be referred to a service provider for voluntary admission when the service provider determines that the individual no longer meets involuntary criteria.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 739, ch. 95-148; s. 29, ch. 2009-132.
397.6758 Release of individual from protective custody, emergency admission, involuntary assessment, involuntary treatment, and alternative involuntary assessment of a minor.An individual involuntarily admitted to a licensed service provider may be released without further order of the court only by a qualified professional in a hospital, a detoxification facility, an addictions receiving facility, or any less restrictive treatment component. Notice of the release must be provided to the applicant in the case of an emergency admission or an alternative involuntary assessment for a minor, or to the petitioner and the court if the involuntary assessment or treatment was court ordered. In the case of a minor, the release must be:
(1) To the individual’s parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian or the authorized designee thereof;
(2) To the Department of Children and Family Services pursuant to s. 39.401; or
(3) To the Department of Juvenile Justice pursuant to s. 984.13.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 35, ch. 98-280; s. 30, ch. 2009-132.
397.6759 Parental participation in treatment.A parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian who seeks involuntary admission of a minor pursuant to ss. 397.675-397.6977 is required to participate in all aspects of treatment as determined appropriate by the director of the licensed service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
B. Noncourt Involved Admissions:
Protective Custody
397.677 Protective custody; circumstances justifying.
397.6771 Protective custody with consent.
397.6772 Protective custody without consent.
397.6773 Dispositional alternatives after protective custody.
397.6774 Department to maintain lists of licensed facilities.
397.6775 Immunity from liability.
397.677 Protective custody; circumstances justifying.A law enforcement officer may implement protective custody measures as specified in this part when a minor or an adult who appears to meet the involuntary admission criteria in s. 397.675 is:
(1) Brought to the attention of law enforcement; or
(2) In a public place.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.6771 Protective custody with consent.A person in circumstances which justify protective custody, as described in s. 397.677, may consent to be assisted by a law enforcement officer to his or her home, to a hospital, or to a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility, whichever the officer determines is most appropriate.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 740, ch. 95-148.
397.6772 Protective custody without consent.
(1) If a person in circumstances which justify protective custody as described in s. 397.677 fails or refuses to consent to assistance and a law enforcement officer has determined that a hospital or a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility is the most appropriate place for the person, the officer may, after giving due consideration to the expressed wishes of the person:
(a) Take the person to a hospital or to a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility against the person’s will but without using unreasonable force; or
(b) In the case of an adult, detain the person for his or her own protection in any municipal or county jail or other appropriate detention facility.

Such detention is not to be considered an arrest for any purpose, and no entry or other record may be made to indicate that the person has been detained or charged with any crime. The officer in charge of the detention facility must notify the nearest appropriate licensed service provider within the first 8 hours after detention that the person has been detained. It is the duty of the detention facility to arrange, as necessary, for transportation of the person to an appropriate licensed service provider with an available bed. Persons taken into protective custody must be assessed by the attending physician within the 72-hour period and without unnecessary delay, to determine the need for further services.

(2) The nearest relative of a minor in protective custody must be notified by the law enforcement officer, as must the nearest relative of an adult, unless the adult requests that there be no notification.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 741, ch. 95-148.
397.6773 Dispositional alternatives after protective custody.
(1) An individual who is in protective custody must be released by a qualified professional when:
(a) The individual no longer meets the involuntary admission criteria in s. 397.675(1);
(b) The 72-hour period has elapsed; or
(c) The individual has consented to remain voluntarily at the licensed service provider.
(2) An individual may only be retained in protective custody beyond the 72-hour period when a petition for involuntary assessment or treatment has been initiated. The timely filing of the petition authorizes the service provider to retain physical custody of the individual pending further order of the court.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 742, ch. 95-148; s. 31, ch. 2009-132.
397.6774 Department to maintain lists of licensed facilities.The department shall provide each municipal and county public safety office with a list of licensed hospitals, detoxification facilities, and addictions receiving facilities, including the name, address, and phone number of, and the services offered by, the licensed service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.6775 Immunity from liability.A law enforcement officer acting in good faith pursuant to this part may not be held criminally or civilly liable for false imprisonment.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
C. Noncourt Involved Admissions;
Emergency
397.679 Emergency admission; circumstances justifying.
397.6791 Emergency admission; persons who may initiate.
397.6793 Physician’s certificate for emergency admission.
397.6795 Transportation-assisted delivery of persons for emergency assessment.
397.6797 Dispositional alternatives after emergency admission.
397.679 Emergency admission; circumstances justifying.A person who meets the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675 may be admitted to a hospital or to a licensed detoxification facility or addictions receiving facility for emergency assessment and stabilization, or to a less intensive component of a licensed service provider for assessment only, upon receipt by the facility of the physician’s certificate and the completion of an application for emergency admission.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.6791 Emergency admission; persons who may initiate.The following persons may request an emergency admission:
(1) In the case of an adult, the certifying physician, the person’s spouse or guardian, any relative of the person, or any other responsible adult who has personal knowledge of the person’s substance abuse impairment.
(2) In the case of a minor, the minor’s parent, legal guardian, or legal custodian.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.6793 Physician’s certificate for emergency admission.
(1) The physician’s certificate must include the name of the person to be admitted, the relationship between the person and the physician, the relationship between the applicant and the physician, any relationship between the physician and the licensed service provider, and a statement that the person has been examined and assessed within 5 days of the application date, and must include factual allegations with respect to the need for emergency admission, including:
(a) The reason for the physician’s belief that the person is substance abuse impaired; and
(b) The reason for the physician’s belief that because of such impairment the person has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse; and either
(c)1. The reason the physician believes that the person has inflicted or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or others unless admitted; or
2. The reason the physician believes that the person’s refusal to voluntarily receive care is based on judgment so impaired by reason of substance abuse that the person is incapable of appreciating his or her need for care and of making a rational decision regarding his or her need for care.
(2) The physician’s certificate must recommend the least restrictive type of service that is appropriate for the person. The certificate must be signed by the physician.
(3) A signed copy of the physician’s certificate shall accompany the person, and shall be made a part of the person’s clinical record, together with a signed copy of the application. The application and physician’s certificate authorize the involuntary admission of the person pursuant to, and subject to the provisions of ss. 397.679-397.6797.
(4) The physician’s certificate must indicate whether the person requires transportation assistance for delivery for emergency admission and specify, pursuant to s. 397.6795, the type of transportation assistance necessary.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 743, ch. 95-148.
397.6795 Transportation-assisted delivery of persons for emergency assessment.An applicant for a person’s emergency admission, or the person’s spouse or guardian, a law enforcement officer, or a health officer may deliver a person named in the physician’s certificate for emergency admission to a hospital or a licensed detoxification facility or addictions receiving facility for emergency assessment and stabilization.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.6797 Dispositional alternatives after emergency admission.Within 72 hours after an emergency admission to a hospital or a licensed detoxification or addictions receiving facility, the individual must be assessed by the attending physician to determine the need for further services. Within 5 days after an emergency admission to a nonresidential component of a licensed service provider, the individual must be assessed by a qualified professional to determine the need for further services. Based upon that assessment, a qualified professional of the hospital, detoxification facility, or addictions receiving facility, or a qualified professional if a less restrictive component was used, must either:
(1) Release the individual and, where appropriate, refer the individual to other needed services; or
(2) Retain the individual when:
(a) The individual has consented to remain voluntarily at the licensed provider; or
(b) A petition for involuntary assessment or treatment has been initiated, the timely filing of which authorizes the service provider to retain physical custody of the individual pending further order of the court.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 32, ch. 2009-132.
D. Noncourt Involved Admissions;
Alternative Involuntary
Assessment for Minors
397.6798 Alternative involuntary assessment procedure for minors.
397.6799 Disposition of minor upon completion of alternative involuntary assessment.
397.6798 Alternative involuntary assessment procedure for minors.
(1) In addition to protective custody, emergency admission, and involuntary assessment and stabilization, an addictions receiving facility may admit a minor for involuntary assessment and stabilization upon the filing of an application to an addictions receiving facility by the minor’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian. The application must establish the need for involuntary assessment and stabilization based on the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675. Within 72 hours after involuntary admission of a minor, the minor must be assessed to determine the need for further services. Assessments must be performed by a qualified professional. If, after the 72-hour period, it is determined by the attending physician that further services are necessary, the minor may be kept for a period of up to 5 days, inclusive of the 72-hour period.
(2) An application for alternative involuntary assessment for a minor must establish the need for immediate involuntary admission and contain the name of the minor to be admitted, the name and signature of the applicant, the relationship between the minor to be admitted and the applicant, and factual allegations with respect to:
(a) The reason for the applicant’s belief that the minor is substance abuse impaired; and
(b) The reason for the applicant’s belief that because of such impairment the minor has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse; and either
(c)1. The reason the applicant believes that the minor has inflicted or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or others unless admitted; or
2. The reason the applicant believes that the minor’s refusal to voluntarily receive substance abuse services is based on judgment so impaired by reason of substance abuse that he or she is incapable of appreciating his or her need for such services and of making a rational decision regarding his or her need for services.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 744, ch. 95-148.
397.6799 Disposition of minor upon completion of alternative involuntary assessment.A minor who has been assessed pursuant to s. 397.6798 must, within the time specified, be released or referred for further voluntary or involuntary treatment, whichever is most appropriate to the needs of the minor.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 33, ch. 2009-132.
E. Court Involved Admissions, Civil
Involuntary Proceedings; Generally
397.681 Involuntary petitions; general provisions; court jurisdiction and right to counsel.
397.681 Involuntary petitions; general provisions; court jurisdiction and right to counsel.
(1) JURISDICTION.The courts have jurisdiction of involuntary assessment and stabilization petitions and involuntary treatment petitions for substance abuse impaired persons, and such petitions must be filed with the clerk of the court in the county where the person is located. The chief judge may appoint a general or special magistrate to preside over all or part of the proceedings. The alleged impaired person is named as the respondent.
(2) RIGHT TO COUNSEL.A respondent has the right to counsel at every stage of a proceeding relating to a petition for his or her involuntary assessment and a petition for his or her involuntary treatment for substance abuse impairment. A respondent who desires counsel and is unable to afford private counsel has the right to court-appointed counsel and to the benefits of s. 57.081. If the court believes that the respondent needs the assistance of counsel, the court shall appoint such counsel for the respondent without regard to the respondent’s wishes. If the respondent is a minor not otherwise represented in the proceeding, the court shall immediately appoint a guardian ad litem to act on the minor’s behalf.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 745, ch. 95-148; s. 79, ch. 2004-11.
F. Court Involved Admissions;
Involuntary Assessment; Stabilization
397.6811 Involuntary assessment and stabilization.
397.6814 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; contents of petition.
397.6815 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; procedure.
397.6818 Court determination.
397.6819 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; responsibility of licensed service provider.
397.6821 Extension of time for completion of involuntary assessment and stabilization.
397.6822 Disposition of individual after involuntary assessment.
397.6811 Involuntary assessment and stabilization.A person determined by the court to appear to meet the criteria for involuntary admission under s. 397.675 may be admitted for a period of 5 days to a hospital or to a licensed detoxification facility or addictions receiving facility, for involuntary assessment and stabilization or to a less restrictive component of a licensed service provider for assessment only upon entry of a court order or upon receipt by the licensed service provider of a petition. Involuntary assessment and stabilization may be initiated by the submission of a petition to the court.
(1) If the person upon whose behalf the petition is being filed is an adult, a petition for involuntary assessment and stabilization may be filed by the respondent’s spouse or guardian, any relative, a private practitioner, the director of a licensed service provider or the director’s designee, or any three adults who have personal knowledge of the respondent’s substance abuse impairment.
(2) If the person upon whose behalf the petition is being filed is a minor, a petition for involuntary assessment and stabilization may be filed by a parent, legal guardian, legal custodian, or licensed service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 746, ch. 95-148.
397.6814 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; contents of petition.A petition for involuntary assessment and stabilization must contain the name of the respondent; the name of the applicant or applicants; the relationship between the respondent and the applicant; the name of the respondent’s attorney, if known, and a statement of the respondent’s ability to afford an attorney; and must state facts to support the need for involuntary assessment and stabilization, including:
(1) The reason for the petitioner’s belief that the respondent is substance abuse impaired; and
(2) The reason for the petitioner’s belief that because of such impairment the respondent has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse; and either
(3)(a) The reason the petitioner believes that the respondent has inflicted or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or others unless admitted; or
(b) The reason the petitioner believes that the respondent’s refusal to voluntarily receive care is based on judgment so impaired by reason of substance abuse that the respondent is incapable of appreciating his or her need for care and of making a rational decision regarding that need for care. If the respondent has refused to submit to an assessment, such refusal must be alleged in the petition.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 747, ch. 95-148.
397.6815 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; procedure.Upon receipt and filing of the petition for the involuntary assessment and stabilization of a substance abuse impaired person by the clerk of the court, the court shall ascertain whether the respondent is represented by an attorney, and if not, whether, on the basis of the petition, an attorney should be appointed; and shall:
(1) Provide a copy of the petition and notice of hearing to the respondent; the respondent’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian, in the case of a minor; the respondent’s attorney, if known; the petitioner; the respondent’s spouse or guardian, if applicable; and such other persons as the court may direct, and have such petition and notice personally delivered to the respondent if he or she is a minor. The court shall also issue a summons to the person whose admission is sought and conduct a hearing within 10 days; or
(2) Without the appointment of an attorney and, relying solely on the contents of the petition, enter an ex parte order authorizing the involuntary assessment and stabilization of the respondent. The court may order a law enforcement officer or other designated agent of the court to take the respondent into custody and deliver him or her to the nearest appropriate licensed service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 748, ch. 95-148.
397.6818 Court determination.At the hearing initiated in accordance with s. 397.6811(1), the court shall hear all relevant testimony. The respondent must be present unless the court has reason to believe that his or her presence is likely to be injurious to him or her, in which event the court shall appoint a guardian advocate to represent the respondent. The respondent has the right to examination by a court-appointed qualified professional. After hearing all the evidence, the court shall determine whether there is a reasonable basis to believe the respondent meets the involuntary admission criteria of s. 397.675.
(1) Based on its determination, the court shall either dismiss the petition or immediately enter an order authorizing the involuntary assessment and stabilization of the respondent; or, if in the course of the hearing the court has reason to believe that the respondent, due to mental illness other than or in addition to substance abuse impairment, is likely to injure himself or herself or another if allowed to remain at liberty, the court may initiate involuntary proceedings under the provisions of part I of chapter 394.
(2) If the court enters an order authorizing involuntary assessment and stabilization, the order shall include the court’s findings with respect to the availability and appropriateness of the least restrictive alternatives and the need for the appointment of an attorney to represent the respondent, and may designate the specific licensed service provider to perform the involuntary assessment and stabilization of the respondent. The respondent may choose the licensed service provider to deliver the involuntary assessment where possible and appropriate.
(3) If the court finds it necessary, it may order the sheriff to take the respondent into custody and deliver him or her to the licensed service provider specified in the court order or, if none is specified, to the nearest appropriate licensed service provider for involuntary assessment.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 749, ch. 95-148.
397.6819 Involuntary assessment and stabilization; responsibility of licensed service provider.A licensed service provider may admit an individual for involuntary assessment and stabilization for a period not to exceed 5 days. The individual must be assessed without unnecessary delay by a qualified professional. If an assessment is performed by a qualified professional who is not a physician, the assessment must be reviewed by a physician before the end of the assessment period.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 34, ch. 2009-132.
397.6821 Extension of time for completion of involuntary assessment and stabilization.If a licensed service provider is unable to complete the involuntary assessment and, if necessary, stabilization of an individual within 5 days after the court’s order, it may, within the original time period, file a written request for an extension of time to complete its assessment, and shall, in accordance with confidentiality requirements, furnish a copy to all parties. With or without a hearing, the court may grant additional time, not to exceed 7 days after the date of the renewal order, for the completion of the involuntary assessment and stabilization of the individual. The original court order authorizing the involuntary assessment and stabilization, or a request for an extension of time to complete the assessment and stabilization that is timely filed pursuant to this section, constitutes legal authority to involuntarily hold the individual for a period not to exceed 10 days in the absence of a court order to the contrary.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 35, ch. 2009-132.
397.6822 Disposition of individual after involuntary assessment.Based upon the involuntary assessment, a qualified professional of the hospital, detoxification facility, or addictions receiving facility, or a qualified professional when a less restrictive component has been used, must:
(1) Release the individual and, where appropriate, refer the individual to another treatment facility or service provider, or to community services;
(2) Allow the individual, with consent, to remain voluntarily at the licensed provider; or
(3) Retain the individual when a petition for involuntary treatment has been initiated, the timely filing of which authorizes the service provider to retain physical custody of the individual pending further order of the court.

Adhering to federal confidentiality regulations, notice of disposition must be provided to the petitioner and to the court.

History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 36, ch. 2009-132.
G. Court Involved Admissions;
Involuntary Treatment
397.693 Involuntary treatment.
397.695 Involuntary treatment; persons who may petition.
397.6951 Contents of petition for involuntary treatment.
397.6955 Duties of court upon filing of petition for involuntary treatment.
397.6957 Hearing on petition for involuntary treatment.
397.697 Court determination; effect of court order for involuntary substance abuse treatment.
397.6971 Early release from involuntary substance abuse treatment.
397.6975 Extension of involuntary substance abuse treatment period.
397.6977 Disposition of individual upon completion of involuntary substance abuse treatment.
397.693 Involuntary treatment.A person may be the subject of a petition for court-ordered involuntary treatment pursuant to this part, if that person meets the criteria for involuntary admission provided in s. 397.675 and:
(1) Has been placed under protective custody pursuant to s. 397.677 within the previous 10 days;
(2) Has been subject to an emergency admission pursuant to s. 397.679 within the previous 10 days;
(3) Has been assessed by a qualified professional within 5 days;
(4) Has been subject to involuntary assessment and stabilization pursuant to s. 397.6818 within the previous 12 days; or
(5) Has been subject to alternative involuntary admission pursuant to s. 397.6822 within the previous 12 days.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39.
397.695 Involuntary treatment; persons who may petition.
(1) If the respondent is an adult, a petition for involuntary treatment may be filed by the respondent’s spouse or guardian, any relative, a service provider, or any three adults who have personal knowledge of the respondent’s substance abuse impairment and his or her prior course of assessment and treatment.
(2) If the respondent is a minor, a petition for involuntary treatment may be filed by a parent, legal guardian, or service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 750, ch. 95-148.
397.6951 Contents of petition for involuntary treatment.A petition for involuntary treatment must contain the name of the respondent to be admitted; the name of the petitioner or petitioners; the relationship between the respondent and the petitioner; the name of the respondent’s attorney, if known, and a statement of the petitioner’s knowledge of the respondent’s ability to afford an attorney; the findings and recommendations of the assessment performed by the qualified professional; and the factual allegations presented by the petitioner establishing the need for involuntary treatment, including:
(1) The reason for the petitioner’s belief that the respondent is substance abuse impaired; and
(2) The reason for the petitioner’s belief that because of such impairment the respondent has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse; and either
(3)(a) The reason the petitioner believes that the respondent has inflicted or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or others unless admitted; or
(b) The reason the petitioner believes that the respondent’s refusal to voluntarily receive care is based on judgment so impaired by reason of substance abuse that the respondent is incapable of appreciating his or her need for care and of making a rational decision regarding that need for care.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 751, ch. 95-148.
397.6955 Duties of court upon filing of petition for involuntary treatment.Upon the filing of a petition for the involuntary treatment of a substance abuse impaired person with the clerk of the court, the court shall immediately determine whether the respondent is represented by an attorney or whether the appointment of counsel for the respondent is appropriate. The court shall schedule a hearing to be held on the petition within 10 days. A copy of the petition and notice of the hearing must be provided to the respondent; the respondent’s parent, guardian, or legal custodian, in the case of a minor; the respondent’s attorney, if known; the petitioner; the respondent’s spouse or guardian, if applicable; and such other persons as the court may direct, and have such petition and order personally delivered to the respondent if he or she is a minor. The court shall also issue a summons to the person whose admission is sought.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 752, ch. 95-148.
397.6957 Hearing on petition for involuntary treatment.
(1) At a hearing on a petition for involuntary treatment, the court shall hear and review all relevant evidence, including the review of results of the assessment completed by the qualified professional in connection with the respondent’s protective custody, emergency admission, involuntary assessment, or alternative involuntary admission. The respondent must be present unless the court finds that his or her presence is likely to be injurious to himself or herself or others, in which event the court must appoint a guardian advocate to act in behalf of the respondent throughout the proceedings.
(2) The petitioner has the burden of proving by clear and convincing evidence:
(a) The respondent is substance abuse impaired, and
(b) Because of such impairment the respondent has lost the power of self-control with respect to substance abuse; and either
1. The respondent has inflicted or is likely to inflict physical harm on himself or herself or others unless admitted; or
2. The respondent’s refusal to voluntarily receive care is based on judgment so impaired by reason of substance abuse that the respondent is incapable of appreciating his or her need for care and of making a rational decision regarding that need for care.
(3) At the conclusion of the hearing the court shall either dismiss the petition or order the respondent to undergo involuntary substance abuse treatment, with the respondent’s chosen licensed service provider to deliver the involuntary substance abuse treatment where possible and appropriate.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 753, ch. 95-148.
397.697 Court determination; effect of court order for involuntary substance abuse treatment.
(1) When the court finds that the conditions for involuntary substance abuse treatment have been proved by clear and convincing evidence, it may order the respondent to undergo involuntary treatment by a licensed service provider for a period not to exceed 60 days. If the court finds it necessary, it may direct the sheriff to take the respondent into custody and deliver him or her to the licensed service provider specified in the court order, or to the nearest appropriate licensed service provider, for involuntary treatment. When the conditions justifying involuntary treatment no longer exist, the individual must be released as provided in s. 397.6971. When the conditions justifying involuntary treatment are expected to exist after 60 days of treatment, a renewal of the involuntary treatment order may be requested pursuant to s. 397.6975 prior to the end of the 60-day period.
(2) In all cases resulting in an order for involuntary substance abuse treatment, the court shall retain jurisdiction over the case and the parties for the entry of such further orders as the circumstances may require. The court’s requirements for notification of proposed release must be included in the original treatment order.
(3) An involuntary treatment order authorizes the licensed service provider to require the individual to undergo such treatment as will benefit him or her, including treatment at any licensable service component of a licensed service provider.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 754, ch. 95-148; s. 37, ch. 2009-132.
397.6971 Early release from involuntary substance abuse treatment.
(1) At any time prior to the end of the 60-day involuntary treatment period, or prior to the end of any extension granted pursuant to s. 397.6975, an individual admitted for involuntary treatment may be determined eligible for discharge to the most appropriate referral or disposition for the individual when:
(a) The individual no longer meets the criteria for involuntary admission and has given his or her informed consent to be transferred to voluntary treatment status;
(b) If the individual was admitted on the grounds of likelihood of infliction of physical harm upon himself or herself or others, such likelihood no longer exists; or
(c) If the individual was admitted on the grounds of need for assessment and stabilization or treatment, accompanied by inability to make a determination respecting such need, either:
1. Such inability no longer exists; or
2. It is evident that further treatment will not bring about further significant improvements in the individual’s condition;
(d) The individual is no longer in need of services; or
(e) The director of the service provider determines that the individual is beyond the safe management capabilities of the provider.
(2) Whenever a qualified professional determines that an individual admitted for involuntary treatment is ready for early release for any of the reasons listed in subsection (1), the service provider shall immediately discharge the individual, and must notify all persons specified by the court in the original treatment order.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 755, ch. 95-148; s. 38, ch. 2009-132.
397.6975 Extension of involuntary substance abuse treatment period.
(1) Whenever a service provider believes that an individual who is nearing the scheduled date of release from involuntary treatment continues to meet the criteria for involuntary treatment in s. 397.693, a petition for renewal of the involuntary treatment order may be filed with the court at least 10 days before the expiration of the court-ordered treatment period. The court shall immediately schedule a hearing to be held not more than 15 days after filing of the petition. The court shall provide the copy of the petition for renewal and the notice of the hearing to all parties to the proceeding. The hearing is conducted pursuant to s. 397.6957.
(2) If the court finds that the petition for renewal of the involuntary treatment order should be granted, it may order the respondent to undergo involuntary treatment for a period not to exceed an additional 90 days. When the conditions justifying involuntary treatment no longer exist, the individual must be released as provided in s. 397.6971. When the conditions justifying involuntary treatment continue to exist after 90 days of additional treatment, a new petition requesting renewal of the involuntary treatment order may be filed pursuant to this section.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 39, ch. 2009-132.
397.6977 Disposition of individual upon completion of involuntary substance abuse treatment.At the conclusion of the 60-day period of court-ordered involuntary treatment, the individual is automatically discharged unless a motion for renewal of the involuntary treatment order has been filed with the court pursuant to s. 397.6975.
History.s. 6, ch. 93-39; s. 40, ch. 2009-132.
LOCAL ORDINANCE PROHIBITION AND
AUTHORIZATION; ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES
397.701 Local ordinances affecting impairment and public impairment offenses forbidden.
397.702 Authorization of local ordinances for treatment of habitual abusers in licensed secure facilities.
397.701 Local ordinances affecting impairment and public impairment offenses forbidden.A county, municipality, or other political subdivision of the state may not, except pursuant to the provisions of s. 397.702, adopt a local law, ordinance, resolution, or regulation having the force of law which provides that impairment in public in and of itself, or being found in enumerated places in an impaired condition, is an offense, a violation, or the subject of civil or criminal sanctions or penalties of any kind. This section does not affect offenses involving the operation of motor vehicles, machinery, or other hazardous equipment.
History.s. 7, ch. 93-39.
397.702 Authorization of local ordinances for treatment of habitual abusers in licensed secure facilities.
(1) Due to the severity in certain areas of the state of chronic and habitual public impairment which infringes upon the public health, safety, and welfare of the citizens, counties and municipalities are authorized to adopt ordinances in strict compliance with this section, notwithstanding the provisions of s. 397.701.
(2) Ordinances for the treatment of habitual abusers must provide:
(a) For the construction and funding, either individually or jointly with other counties or municipalities, of a licensed secure facility to be used exclusively for the treatment of habitual abusers who meet the criteria in paragraph (b).
(b) That when seeking treatment of a habitual abuser, the county or municipality, through an officer or agent specified in the ordinance, must file with the court a petition which alleges the following information about the alleged habitual abuser (the respondent):
1. The name, address, age, and gender of the respondent.
2. The name of any spouse, adult child, other relative, or guardian of the respondent, if known to the petitioner, and the efforts by the petitioner, if any, to ascertain this information.
3. The name of the petitioner, the name of the person who has physical custody of the respondent, and the current location of the respondent.
4. That the respondent has been taken into custody for impairment in a public place, or has been arrested for an offense committed while impaired, three or more times during the preceding 12 months.
5. Specific facts indicating that the respondent meets the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675.
6. Whether the respondent was advised of his or her right to be represented by counsel and to request that the court appoint an attorney if he or she is unable to afford one, and whether the respondent indicated to petitioner his or her desire to have an attorney appointed.
(c) That the court with jurisdiction to make the determination authorized by this section shall hear the petition on an emergency basis as soon as practicable but not later than 10 days after the date the petition was filed. If the allegations of the petition indicate that the respondent has requested the appointment of an attorney, or otherwise indicate the absence of any competent person to speak at the hearing on behalf of the respondent, the court shall immediately appoint an attorney to represent the respondent pursuant to s. 397.501(8), and shall provide notice of the hearing to the attorney. When the court sets a hearing date the petitioner shall provide notice of the hearing and a copy of the petition to all of the persons named in the petition pursuant to subparagraph (b)2., and to such other persons as may be ordered by the court to receive notice.
(d) That, upon the court’s determination that the allegations of the petition as stated in paragraph (b) are established, the respondent is a habitual abuser and must be detained at the licensed secure facility for a period of up to 90 days as determined by the court for the purpose of participating in a treatment program.
(e) That, if the individual still meets the criteria for involuntary admission in s. 397.675 at or near the expiration of the treatment period ordered by the court pursuant to paragraph (d), the agent of the county or municipality may file another habitual abuser petition pursuant to paragraph (b) for a period not exceeding 180 days for each such petition.
(f) That a person who is reasonably suspected of meeting the criteria in paragraph (b) may be detained at a licensed service provider or at a licensed secure facility for a period not exceeding 96 hours for purposes of the preparation and filing of the petition.
(3) When a petition is filed under an ordinance authorized by this section, alleging a reasonable suspicion that the respondent meets the criteria in paragraph (2)(b), the department and any licensed service provider director with relevant information must, upon the court’s request and in accordance with federal confidentiality regulations, furnish the court with all information necessary to determine the accuracy of the allegations.
(4) This section does not affect the operation under contract of any licensed secure correctional facility or licensed service provider at a secure correctional facility which is not operating pursuant to an ordinance adopted under authorization of this section.
History.s. 7, ch. 93-39; s. 756, ch. 95-148; s. 41, ch. 2009-132.
OFFENDER REFERRALS
397.705 Referral of substance abuse impaired offenders to service providers.
397.706 Screening, assessment, and disposition of juvenile offenders.
397.705 Referral of substance abuse impaired offenders to service providers.
(1) AUTHORITY TO REFER.If any offender, including but not limited to any minor, is charged with or convicted of a crime, the court or criminal justice authority with jurisdiction over that offender may require the offender to receive services from a service provider licensed under this chapter. If referred by the court, the referral shall be in addition to final adjudication, imposition of penalty or sentence, or other action. The court may consult with or seek the assistance of a service provider concerning such a referral. Assignment to a service provider is contingent upon availability of space, budgetary considerations, and manageability of the offender.
(2) REFERRAL AND TREATMENT.
(a) An order referring an offender under subsection (1) must be in writing and must be signed by the referral source. The order must specify the name of the offender, the name and address of the service provider to which the offender is referred, the date of the referral, the duration of the offender’s sentence, and all conditions stipulated by the referral source. The total amount of time the offender is required to receive treatment may not exceed the maximum length of sentence possible for the offense with which the offender is charged or convicted. A copy of the order must be delivered to the service provider.
(b) The director may refuse to admit any offender referred to the service provider under subsection (1). The director’s refusal to admit the offender must be communicated immediately and in writing within 72 hours to the referral source, stating the basis for such refusal.
(c) The director may, after consulting with the referral source, discharge any offender referred to the service provider under subsection (1) when, in the judgment of the director, the offender is beyond the safe management capabilities of the service provider. The director must orally communicate a decision to discharge an offender to the offender and to the referral source, immediately, and must communicate the decision in writing within 72 hours thereafter, stating the basis for the determination that the offender is beyond the safe management capabilities of the facility.
(d) When an offender successfully completes treatment or when the time period during which the offender is required to receive treatment expires, the director shall communicate such fact to the referral source.
History.s. 8, ch. 93-39; s. 38, ch. 97-194.
397.706 Screening, assessment, and disposition of juvenile offenders.
(1) The substance abuse treatment needs of juvenile offenders and their families must be identified and addressed through diversionary programs and adjudicatory proceedings pursuant to chapter 984 or chapter 985.
(2) The juvenile and circuit courts, in conjunction with department substate entity administration, shall establish policies and procedures to ensure that juvenile offenders are appropriately screened for substance abuse problems and that diversionary and adjudicatory proceedings include appropriate conditions and sanctions to address substance abuse problems. Policies and procedures must address:
(a) The designation of local service providers responsible for screening and assessment services and dispositional recommendations to the department and the court.
(b) The means by which juvenile offenders are processed to ensure participation in screening and assessment services.
(c) The role of the court in securing assessments when juvenile offenders or their families are noncompliant.
(d) Safeguards to ensure that information derived through screening and assessment is used solely to assist in dispositional decisions and not for purposes of determining innocence or guilt.
(3) Because resources available to support screening and assessment services are limited, the judicial circuits and department substate entity administration must develop those capabilities to the extent possible within available resources according to the following priorities:
(a) Juvenile substance abuse offenders.
(b) Juvenile offenders who are substance abuse impaired at the time of the offense.
(c) Second or subsequent juvenile offenders.
(d) Minors taken into custody.
(4) The court may require juvenile offenders and their families to participate in substance abuse assessment and treatment services in accordance with the provisions of chapter 984 or chapter 985 and may use its contempt powers to enforce its orders.
History.s. 8, ch. 93-39; s. 36, ch. 98-280; s. 42, ch. 2009-132.
INMATE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS
397.752 Scope of part.
397.753 Definitions.
397.754 Duties and responsibilities of the Department of Corrections.
397.752 Scope of part.An inmate’s substance abuse service records are confidential in accordance with s. 397.501(7). No other provision of parts I-VII of this chapter applies to inmates except as indicated by the context or specified.
History.s. 9, ch. 93-39.
397.753 Definitions.As used in this part:
(1) “Department” means the Department of Corrections.
(2) “Inmate” means any person committed by a court of competent jurisdiction to the custody of the Department of Corrections, including transfers from federal and state agencies under the Interstate Corrections Compact.
(3) “Inmate substance abuse services” means any service component as defined in s. 397.311 provided directly by the Department of Corrections and licensed and regulated by the Department of Children and Family Services pursuant to s. 397.406, or provided through contractual arrangements with a service provider licensed pursuant to part II; or any self-help program or volunteer support group operating for inmates.
History.s. 9, ch. 93-39; s. 108, ch. 99-8.
397.754 Duties and responsibilities of the Department of Corrections.The Department of Corrections shall:
(1) To the fullest extent possible provide inmates upon arrival at a Department of Corrections reception center for initial processing with an assessment of substance abuse service needs.
(2) Provide inmates who are admitted to inmate substance abuse services with an individualized treatment plan which is developed on the basis of assessed need for services and which includes measurable goals and specifies the types of services needed to meet those goals.
(3) To the fullest extent possible provide inmates with individualized services.
(4) Develop and maintain systematic methods of research, evaluation, and monitoring of the appropriateness and quality of substance abuse programs.
(5) Provide inmates who have participated in substance abuse programs within 1 month of the date of their final release from the correctional facility in which they are incarcerated with information regarding options for continuing substance abuse services in the community and with referrals for such services as appropriate or upon the inmate’s request.
(6) In cooperation with other agencies, actively seek to enhance resources for the provision of treatment services for inmates and to develop partnerships with other state agencies, including but not limited to the Departments of Children and Family Services, Education, Community Affairs, and Law Enforcement.
(7) To the extent of available funding, provide training to employees whose duties involve the provision of inmate substance abuse services.
(8) The department shall by rule set forth procedures with respect to individual dignity, nondiscriminatory services, quality services, communication for inmates who receive treatment for substance abuse, and confidentiality requirements in accordance with federal law.
History.s. 9, ch. 93-39; s. 109, ch. 99-8.
SERVICES COORDINATION
397.801 Substance abuse impairment coordination.
397.811 Juvenile substance abuse impairment coordination; legislative findings and intent.
397.821 Juvenile substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention councils.
397.801 Substance abuse impairment coordination.
(1) The Department of Children and Family Services, the Department of Education, the Department of Corrections, and the Department of Law Enforcement each shall appoint a policy level staff person to serve as the agency substance abuse impairment coordinator. The responsibilities of the agency coordinator include interagency and intraagency coordination, collection and dissemination of agency-specific data relating to substance abuse impairment, and participation in the development of the state comprehensive plan for substance abuse impairment.
(2) The department shall establish, within each of its substate entities, the full-time position of substance abuse impairment prevention coordinator, to be filled by a person with expertise in the area of substance abuse impairment. The primary responsibility of this person is to develop and implement activities which foster the prevention of substance abuse impairment.
History.s. 10, ch. 93-39; s. 110, ch. 99-8; s. 5, ch. 99-187; s. 43, ch. 2009-132; s. 274, ch. 2011-142.
397.811 Juvenile substance abuse impairment coordination; legislative findings and intent.
(1) The Legislature recognizes that a substance abuse impairment crisis is destroying our youth and is the underlying cause of many juveniles entering the juvenile justice system, and that substance abuse impairment contributes to the crime rate, the school dropout rate, youth suicide, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, and substance-exposed newborns. The economic cost of substance abuse impairment to the state drains existing resources, and the cost to victims, both economic and psychological, is traumatic and tragic. The Legislature also recognizes that substance abuse impairment is a community problem, a family problem, a societal problem, and a judicial problem and that there is a critical need to address this emergency immediately. Therefore, it is the intent of the Legislature that scarce funds be invested in prevention and early intervention programs.
(2) It is the intent of the Legislature to provide authority for the department to expand existing services to juveniles, to contract with community-based substance abuse service providers for the provision of specialized services, and to have prototype models developed prior to statewide implementation.
History.s. 10, ch. 93-39; s. 5, ch. 99-187.
397.821 Juvenile substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention councils.
(1) Each judicial circuit as set forth in s. 26.021 may establish a juvenile substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention council composed of at least 12 members, including representatives from law enforcement, the department, school districts, state attorney and public defender offices, the circuit court, the religious community, substance abuse impairment professionals, child advocates from the community, business leaders, parents, and high school students. However, those circuits which already have in operation a council of similar composition may designate the existing body as the juvenile substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention council for the purposes of this section. Each council shall establish bylaws providing for the length of term of its members, but the term may not exceed 4 years. The substate entity administrator, as defined in s. 20.19, and the chief judge of the circuit court shall each appoint six members of the council. The substate entity administrator shall appoint a representative from the department, a school district representative, a substance abuse impairment treatment professional, a child advocate, a parent, and a high school student. The chief judge of the circuit court shall appoint a business leader and representatives from the state attorney’s office, the public defender’s office, the religious community, the circuit court, and law enforcement agencies.
(2) The purpose of each council is to identify the needs of its community in the area of juvenile substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention. In order to carry out its responsibilities, the council shall assess the need for substance abuse impairment prevention and early intervention service providers, identify priorities for providers and services, propose methods of coordination of services to ensure effectiveness and avoid duplication and fragmentation, and develop recommendations to address the identified needs.
(3) The council shall provide recommendations to the Program Director for Substance Abuse annually for consideration for inclusion in the substance abuse and mental health substate entity plans.
History.s. 10, ch. 93-39; s. 67, ch. 94-209; s. 4, ch. 99-187; s. 55, ch. 2000-139; s. 44, ch. 2009-132.
JUVENILE EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND
CHILDREN’S SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES
397.901 Prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities.
397.92 Children’s substance abuse services system; goals.
397.93 Children’s substance abuse services; target populations.
397.94 Children’s substance abuse services; information and referral network.
397.95 Children’s substance abuse services; services provided by licensed providers.
397.951 Treatment and sanctions.
397.96 Case management for complex substance abuse cases.
397.97 Children’s substance abuse services; demonstration models.
397.98 Children’s substance abuse services; utilization management.
397.99 School substance abuse prevention partnership grants.
397.997 Prevention resources; Internet website.
397.998 Drug-free communities support match grants.
397.901 Prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities.
(1) Prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities may be designated to provide substance abuse impairment treatment services and community-based detoxification, stabilization, and short-term treatment and medical care to juveniles found to be impaired, in need of emergency treatment as a consequence of being impaired, or incapable of making an informed decision about their need for care.
(2)(a) The department shall designate and initiate prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities in geographic areas where the substance abuse impairment crisis places juveniles and their families at the greatest risk because of an unfavorable combination of social, environmental, and economic conditions which include such factors as poverty, a high crime rate, a high incidence of substance abuse impairment, and a high dropout rate. To receive funding under this section, a prospective service provider must demonstrate:
1. Its capacity to administer and coordinate the programs and services in a comprehensive manner and render a flexible range of services.
2. Its capacity to identify and serve those juveniles least able to access existing service providers and ancillary services.
3. Its capacity to administer and coordinate the services in an intensive and continuous manner.
4. The proximity of its facilities to juveniles and their families to be served by the service provider, or its ability to provide offsite services to such persons.
5. Its ability to use existing federal, state, and local governmental programs and services during implementation.
6. Its ability to coordinate activities and services with existing public, private, state, and local agencies and programs intended to assist juveniles and their families.
7. How its plan will involve participants and community representatives in the planning and operation of the service provider.
8. Its ability to participate in the assessment component required in this chapter.
9. Its consistency with the stated legislative intent.
(b) While a flexible range of services is essential, the following services are the core group of services:
1. Treatment services.
2. Education services.
3. Family services.

Additional services may include mental health services, housing assistance, transportation, and nutrition services.

(c) The department may implement the prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities component of the emergency assessment and specialized treatment services within resources appropriated for this purpose. Using the criteria provided in this section, the department shall evaluate and select the service providers and sites to be funded initially.
(3) Cities and counties may appropriate funds to support all or any portion of the cost of services and construction for community-based service providers under subsection (2) not met through state or federal funds. Communities desiring to apply for the designation of the most intensive level of care must use local funds for any facility modifications necessary, unless they are one of the prototype juvenile addictions receiving facilities.
(4) The department shall adopt rules necessary to implement this section. The rules must be written by the department’s Substance Abuse Program Office and must specify criteria for staffing and services delineated for the provision of graduated levels of care from nonintensive to environmentally secure for the handling of aggressive and difficult-to-manage behavior and the prevention of elopement.
History.s. 11, ch. 93-39; s. 56, ch. 2000-139; s. 11, ch. 2000-337.
397.92 Children’s substance abuse services system; goals.
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that the children’s substance abuse services system achieve the following performance outcomes for children who are eligible for services:
(a) Identification of the presenting problems and conditions of substance abuse through the use of valid assessment.
(b) Improvement in the child’s ability to function in the family with minimum supports.
(c) Improvement in the child’s ability to function in school with minimum supports.
(d) Improvement in the child’s ability to function in the community with minimum supports.
(e) Improvement in the child’s ability to live drug-free.
(f) Reduction of behaviors and conditions that may be linked to substance abuse, such as unintended pregnancy, delinquency, sexually transmitted diseases, and smoking, and other negative behaviors.
(g) Increased return of children in state custody, drug-free, to their homes, or the placement of such children, drug-free, in an appropriate setting.
(2) Pursuant to 1s. 216.0166, the department shall annually develop performance outcomes and performance measures to assess the performance of the children’s substance abuse services system in achieving the intent of this section.
History.s. 7, ch. 99-396.
1Note.Repealed by s. 61, ch. 2000-371.
397.93 Children’s substance abuse services; target populations.The target populations for children’s substance abuse services are children at risk for substance abuse and children with substance abuse problems.
(1) Children at risk for substance abuse include:
(a) Children who are at risk due to regular or periodic exposure to negative factors related to family, community, school, self, or peers. Children in this category are typically placed in special prevention programs which are often school-based and which emphasize the importance of protective factors to reduce risk.
(b) Children who are at risk due to experimental and social use of substances. Children in this category are typically placed in early intervention programs which may occur in the community or school.
(2) Children with substance abuse problems include:
(a) Children who use substances on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Children in this category typically need outpatient counseling and in some cases more structured day or night treatment.
(b) Children with a substance dependency or addiction. Children in this category typically need structured day or night treatment or more intensive and longer term residential treatment, with some severe cases initially in need of detoxification and stabilization.
History.s. 8, ch. 99-396.
397.94 Children’s substance abuse services; information and referral network.
(1) The substate entity shall determine the most cost-effective method for delivering this service and may select a new provider or utilize an existing provider or providers with a record of success in providing information and referral services.
(a) The plan must provide assurances that the information and referral network will include a resource directory that contains information regarding the children’s substance abuse services available, including, but not limited to:
1. Public and private resources by service component, including resources for involuntary admissions under s. 397.675.
2. Hours of operation and hours during which services are provided.
3. Ages of persons served.
4. Description of services.
5. Eligibility requirements.
6. Fee schedules.
(b) Maintain and annually update information regarding private practitioners in the community who provide substance abuse services to children.
(c) Develop and implement procedures for documenting requests for services, including, but not limited to:
1. Number of calls by type of service requested, if any;
2. Ages of children for whom services are requested; and
3. Disposition on all referrals, including location of resource if referred for screening.
(d) Develop and implement procedures for sharing information with participating community agencies and resources.
(2) In planning the information and referral network, the substate entity shall consider the establishment of a 24-hour toll-free telephone number to call for information and a public service campaign to inform the public about the information and referral service.
History.s. 9, ch. 99-396; s. 2, ch. 2000-337; s. 45, ch. 2009-132; s. 106, ch. 2010-102.
397.95 Children’s substance abuse services; services provided by licensed providers.Each substate entity of the department shall ensure that all screening, intake, assessment, enrollment, service planning, and case management services provided under this part are provided by children’s substance abuse services providers licensed under part II of this chapter and in accordance with standards set forth in department rules.
History.s. 10, ch. 99-396; s. 46, ch. 2009-132.
397.951 Treatment and sanctions.The Legislature recognizes that the integration of treatment and sanctions greatly increases the effectiveness of substance abuse treatment. It is the responsibility of the department and the substance abuse treatment provider to employ the full measure of sanctions available to require participation and completion of treatment to ensure successful outcomes for children in substance abuse treatment.
(1) Pursuant to the provisions of this chapter, the department shall ensure that substance abuse treatment providers develop and manage treatment plans that are appropriate to the severity of the substance abuse problem and tailored to the individual needs of the child.
(2) The department shall ensure that substance abuse treatment providers employ any and all appropriate available sanctions necessary to engage, motivate, and maintain a child in treatment, including, but not limited to, provisions in law that:
(a) Provide for parental participation in treatment for involuntary admission to treatment, as provided in part IV of this chapter.
(b) Provide for law enforcement authorities to assume custody of a child who is substance abuse impaired and allow placement of a child into the care of a hospital, substance abuse detoxification facility, or addiction receiving facility, as specified in part V of this chapter.
(c) Provide parental authority to involuntarily admit a child for assessment to an addiction receiving facility, as specified in part V of this chapter.
(d) Provide parents and substance abuse providers with civil involuntary procedures to secure court-ordered assessment and treatment for children, as specified in part V of this chapter.
(e) Authorize the court or any criminal justice authority with jurisdiction over a child charged or convicted of a crime to require that the delinquent or offender receive substance abuse services under part VII of this chapter.
(f) Provide authority of the court and contempt powers to require parental participation in the treatment of a delinquent or offender pursuant to s. 397.706.
(g) Authorize the court to mandate services for children and their families in dependency proceedings under chapter 39, and children and families in need of services under chapter 984.
(h) Provide that the use, possession, or sale of controlled substances, as defined in chapter 893, or possession of electronic telephone pagers, by any student while such student is upon school property or in attendance at a school function is grounds for disciplinary action by the school and may also result in criminal penalties being imposed pursuant to s. 1006.09(1)-(4).
(i) Provide that, pursuant to s. 322.056, for any person under 18 years of age who is found guilty of or delinquent for a violation of s. 562.11(2), s. 562.111, or chapter 893, and is eligible by reason of age for a driver’s license or driving privilege, the court shall direct the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to revoke or to withhold issuance of his or her driver’s license or driving privilege for a period of:
1. Not less than 6 months and not more than 1 year for the first violation.
2. Two years, for a subsequent violation.
History.s. 11, ch. 99-396; s. 987, ch. 2002-387.
397.96 Case management for complex substance abuse cases.
(1) Contingent upon specific appropriations, it is the intent of the Legislature to provide for a more intensive level of case management for complex cases involving children who need substance abuse services. Such services shall be directed toward children receiving services from several agencies or programs to address the complex problems created by substance abuse, dependency, or addiction.
(2) The department shall determine when a child receiving children’s substance abuse services under this part shall have a case manager.
(3) For the purposes of this section, “case management” means those activities aimed at:
(a) Implementing a treatment plan;
(b) Advocacy;
(c) Linking services providers to a child and family;
(d) Monitoring services delivery; and
(e) Collecting information to determine the effect of services and treatment.
(4) The case manager shall periodically review services utilization to ascertain compliance with plans approved by the planning team.
(5) The department shall establish by rule standards to coordinate case management activities from various referral points, in order to minimize fragmentation and duplication and promote stability of case managers assigned to a child and family. In the attempt to minimize duplication, it is the intent of the Legislature that a child have no more than one case manager.
History.s. 12, ch. 99-396.
397.97 Children’s substance abuse services; demonstration models.
(1) CREATION; PURPOSE.There is created the Children’s Network of Care Demonstration Models to operate, for 4 years, for children who are at risk of substance abuse or who have substance abuse problems. The purpose of the demonstration models is to encourage collaboration among the department, the Agency for Health Care Administration, the Department of Education, the Department of Health, the Department of Juvenile Justice, local government agencies, and any other interested party, through a partnership agreement entered into to provide a locally organized network of care for children and their families. The demonstration models must:
(a) Be implemented using existing funds;
(b) Center on the child and his or her family;
(c) Promote integration and coordination of services;
(d) Provide for accountable outcomes; and
(e) Emphasize the provision of services in the least restrictive, most appropriate setting, utilizing uniform placement criteria established in rule of the department.
(2) GOAL.The goal of the Children’s Network of Care Demonstration Models is to create an effective interagency strategy for delivering substance abuse services to the target populations through a local network of service providers. The specific objectives of this strategy are to:
(a) Develop standardized forms and uniform procedures which shall be used for screening, intake, assessment, enrollment, service planning, case management, and utilization management;
(b) Eliminate duplication of services;
(c) Employ natural supports in the family and the community to help meet the service needs of the child who is at risk of substance abuse or has a substance abuse problem;
(d) Improve interagency planning efforts through greater collaboration between public and private community-based agencies;
(e) Test creative and flexible strategies for financing the care of children who are at risk of substance abuse or have a substance abuse problem; and
(f) Share information about the child with appropriate community agencies.
(3) PURCHASE OF SERVICES; OPERATION CRITERIA.
(a) Each demonstration model shall be governed by a multiagency consortium of state and county agencies or other public agencies, or a community-based, not-for-profit substance abuse or behavioral health network designated by the department, hereafter referred to as the purchasing agent, which shall purchase individualized services for children who are at risk of substance abuse or have a substance abuse problem. Services shall be based on need rather than on traditional services limited to narrowly defined cost centers or appropriations categories. Approval to operate as a Children’s Network of Care Demonstration Model shall be given by the secretary of the department and shall be based on criteria developed by the department.
(b) The local purchasing agent is responsible for designing a well-defined network of experienced substance abuse services providers. At a minimum, the consortium shall:
1. Specify the capacity and composition of the provider network;
2. Approve providers for the network;
3. Ensure enrollees’ access to network services;
4. Subcontract with providers;
5. Establish qualification standards for provider staff; and
6. Monitor providers’ performance.
History.s. 13, ch. 99-396; s. 61, ch. 2005-2; s. 47, ch. 2009-132.
397.98 Children’s substance abuse services; utilization management.
(1) Utilization management shall be an integral part of each Children’s Network of Care Demonstration Model as described under s. 397.97. The utilization management process shall include procedures for analyzing the allocation and use of resources by the purchasing agent. Such procedures shall include:
(a) Monitoring the appropriateness of admissions to residential services or other levels of care as determined by the department.
(b) Monitoring the duration of care.
(c) Developing profiles of network providers which describe their patterns of delivering care.
(d) Authorizing care for high-cost services.
(2) The procedures shall be established by the purchasing agent in consultation with the department and are subject to approval by the secretary of the department. The implementation of utilization management within the demonstration models shall be contingent upon the availability of funds.
History.s. 14, ch. 99-396.
397.99 School substance abuse prevention partnership grants.
(1) GRANT PROGRAM.
(a) In order to encourage the development of effective substance abuse prevention and early intervention strategies for school-age populations, the school substance abuse prevention partnership grant program is established.
(b) The department shall administer the program in cooperation with the Department of Education and the Department of Juvenile Justice.
(2) APPLICATION PROCEDURES; FUNDING REQUIREMENTS.
(a) Schools, or community-based organizations in partnership with schools, may submit a grant proposal for funding or continued funding to the department by March 1 of each year. The department shall establish grant application procedures which ensure that grant recipients implement programs and practices that are effective. The department shall include the grant application document on an Internet website.
(b) Grants may fund programs to conduct prevention activities serving students who are not involved in substance use, intervention activities serving students who are experimenting with substance use, or both prevention and intervention activities, if a comprehensive approach is indicated as a result of a needs assessment.
(c) Grants may target youth, parents, and teachers and other school staff, coaches, social workers, case managers, and other prevention stakeholders.
(d) Performance measures for grant program activities shall measure improvements in student attitudes or behaviors as determined by the department.
(e) At least 50 percent of the grant funds available for local projects must be allocated to support the replication of prevention programs and practices that are based on research and have been evaluated and proven effective. The department shall develop related qualifying criteria.
(f) In order to be considered for funding, the grant application shall include the following assurances and information:
1. A letter from the administrators of the programs collaborating on the project, such as the school principal, community-based organization executive director, or recreation department director, confirming that the grant application has been reviewed and that each partner is committed to supporting implementation of the activities described in the grant proposal.
2. A rationale and description of the program and the services to be provided, including:
a. An analysis of prevention issues related to the substance abuse prevention profile of the target population.
b. A description of other primary substance use and related risk factors.
c. Goals and objectives based on the findings of the needs assessment.
d. The selection of programs or strategies that have been shown to be effective in addressing the findings of the needs assessment.
e. A method of identifying the target group for universal prevention strategies, and a method for identifying the individual student participants in selected and indicated prevention strategies.
f. A description of how students will be targeted.
g. Provisions for the participation of parents and guardians in the program.
h. An evaluation component to measure the effectiveness of the program in accordance with performance-based program budgeting effectiveness measures.
i. A program budget, which includes the amount and sources of local cash and in-kind resources committed to the budget and which establishes, to the satisfaction of the department, that the entity will make a cash or in-kind contribution to the program of a value that is at least 25 percent of the amount of the grant.
(g) The department shall consider the following in awarding such grants:
1. The number of youths that will be targeted.
2. The validity of the program design to achieve project goals and objectives that are clearly related to performance-based program budgeting effectiveness measures.
3. The desirability of funding at least one approved project in each of the department’s substate entities.
(3) The department shall coordinate the review of grant applications with the Department of Education and the Department of Juvenile Justice and shall make award determinations no later than June 30 of each year. All applicants shall be notified by the department of its final action.
(4) Each entity that is awarded a grant as provided for in this section shall submit performance and output information as determined by the department.
(5) The department shall establish rules as necessary to implement this section.
History.s. 15, ch. 99-396; s. 48, ch. 2009-132.
397.997 Prevention resources; Internet website.
(1) The department shall develop a publicly available substance abuse prevention Internet website. The information on the Internet website shall target youth and their parents, teachers, and other stakeholders.
(2) The Internet website shall incorporate, at a minimum, the following components;
(a) The nature of Florida’s current youth alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use concerns;
(b) The health, social, and legal effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use on individuals, families, schools, and the economy;
(c) National, state, and local substance abuse prevention and treatment resources; and
(d) Classroom, home, and individual instructional activities and games geared to teach targeted youth about the harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, or other drug use, refusal and other prevention skills, and how to get help for someone using drugs.
History.s. 16, ch. 99-396.
397.998 Drug-free communities support match grants.
(1) PURPOSE.The purposes of drug-free communities match grants are to:
(a) Assist community coalitions in an effort to secure federal drug-free communities support program grants under Pub. L. No. 105-20.
(b) Reduce substance abuse among youth and, over time, to reduce substance abuse among adults.
(c) Enable community coalitions to strengthen collaboration efforts among public and private agencies to reduce substance abuse among youth.
(2) APPLICATION PROCESS.
(a) Contingent upon specific appropriations, the department shall establish a program to provide drug-free communities match grants.
(b) The grants shall be used for all or part of the match required for community coalitions to secure a federal drug-free communities support program grant.
(3) ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS.
(a) Community coalitions whose members have worked together on substance abuse reduction initiatives for a period of not less than 6 months are eligible to apply for match grant funds.
(b) The coalition must represent the targeted community and include at least one representative of each of the following groups: local Department of Children and Family Services official; youth; parents; business community; media; schools; organizations serving youth; law enforcement agencies; religious or fraternal organizations; civic and volunteer groups; health care professionals; other local or tribal governmental agencies with an expertise in the field of substance abuse, including, if applicable, the state authority with primary authority for substance abuse; and other organizations involved in reducing substance abuse.
(c) To demonstrate that the coalition meets the stated criteria, the applicant must submit examples or formal agreements, such as memorandums of understanding, previous newsletters or publications, or other examples of print media coverage that are dated within 6 months prior to submittal of the application.
(4) RELEASE OF FUNDS.Match grant funds shall be released as required by federal regulations to community coalitions upon documentation that a community coalition has been awarded a drug-free communities support program grant.
(5) IN-KIND MATCH.The department may provide other in-kind services or goods allowed by federal regulations in lieu of money, to achieve the purpose of this section.
(6) RULES.The department is authorized to adopt rules specifically to address procedures necessary to administer the drug-free communities match grants as provided in this section.
History.s. 17, ch. 99-396.