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Statute Search Tips

The Statutes search is located above the Statutes in the Law section. Select a "Year" and enter multiple words, a number, or a phrase in the "Search Term" box to conduct a search. Refine searches further by defining a specific chapter number.

Examples:

  • Select 2010 and enter property tax in the "Search Term" box. Results display 2010 Statutes that reference property tax ordered by Chapter, then Section.

    Example of Statutes results when entering 'property tax' in the Search Term field

  • Select 2010, enter homeowner in the "Search Term" field and 489 in the "Within Chapter" field. Results display 2010 Statutes located in Chapter 489 that reference homeowner ordered by Chapter, then Section.

    Example of Statutes results when entering 'homeowner' in the Search Term field and '489' in the Within Chapter field

  • Select 2010 and enter a statute number in the "Search Term" field. Results display 2010 Statutes that reference that statute number ordered by Chapter, then Section.

    Example of all 4 results from 287.063 Advanced Search

  • Flsenate.gov returns results for exact matches to your search terms.
  • Searches are not case sensitive. All letters, regardless of how you type them, will be understood as lower case.
  • Stemming — Search results include suffixes of the word used, such as work, worked, working, etc.
  • Single and multiple wildcard characters:
    • Use an asterisk (*) as a wildcard at the end or beginning of a word to expand the search results. Example: govern* for govern, governs, governing, government, governmental, governor, etc.
    • To fill in a missing variable, use a question mark (?) as a wild card at the end, beginning or anywhere within a portion of a word. Example: wom?n searches for woman, women, etc.
  • Boolean operators — Specify words, exclude words, or add complex combinations of words to be queried by using Boolean Operators. Boolean Operators should be represented by words (and, or, not) and not symbols (&, |, ^). For example, a search for dog and cat will result in documents with both dog and cat.
  • If a search word or phrase did not turn up what you were looking for, try rephrasing your query. For example, a search on car and a search on motor vehicle return different sets of results.
  • Phrase searches are similar to multiple-word searches, except words are not separated by a comma.